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Cornell University    
 
    
 
  Oct 17, 2017
 
Courses of Study 2012-2013 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

LATA—Latin American Studies

  
  •  

    LATA 3020 - Spanish in the Disciplines

    (crosslisted)
    (also SPAN 3020 )
    Fall, spring. 1 credit.

    Conducted in Spanish.

    Staff.

    For description see SPAN 3020 .

  
  •  

    LATA 3065 - Immigrant America: Race and Citizenship in Modern Working-Class History

    (crosslisted)
    (also ILRLR 3065 , LSP 3065 )
    Spring. 4 credits.

    V. Martinez-Matsuda.

    For description, see ILRLR 3065 .

  
  •  

    LATA 3256 - [Ancient Civilizations of the Andes]

    (crosslisted)
    (also ANTHR 3256 , ARKEO 3256 ) (GHB) (HA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2014-2015.

    J. Henderson.

    For description, see ANTHR 3256 .

  
  •  

    LATA 3290 - Comparative Politics of Latin America

    (crosslisted)
    (also DSOC 3290 GOVT 3293 ) (GB) (SBA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits.

    G. Flores-Macias.

    For description, see GOVT 3293 .

  
  •  

    LATA 3550 - Ancient Mexico and Central America

    (crosslisted)
    (also ANTHR 3255 , ARKEO 3255 ) (GHB) (HA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    J. Henderson.

    For description, see ANTHR 3255 .

  
  •  

    LATA 3565 - Art & Architecture of Colonial Latin America

    (crosslisted)
    (also ARTH 3565 , VISST 3565 ) (GHB) (CA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits.

    A. Cohen.

    For description, see ARTH 3565 .

  
  •  

    LATA 3609 - Brazilian Ensemble - Deixa Samba

    (crosslisted)
    (also MUSIC 3609 )
    Fall, spring. 1 credit.

    Permission of instructor required.

    S. Pond.

    For description, see MUSIC 3609 .

  
  •  

    LATA 3613 - Cornell Steel Band

    (crosslisted)
    (also MUSIC 3613 )
    Fall. 0-1 credit, variable.

    Prerequisite: audition with instructor.

    T. Feeney.

    For description, see MUSIC 3613 .

  
  •  

    LATA 3734 - Brazil: Many Cultures, One Nation

    (crosslisted)
    (also ANTHR 3734 ) (GB) (CA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits.

    J. Fajans.

    For description, see ANTHR 3734 .

  
  
  •  

    LATA 4000 - Contemporary Issues in Latin - Latino America

    (crosslisted)
    (also LSP 4000 )
    Fall, spring. 1 credit.

    Co-meets with LATA 6000 /LSP 6000 .

    Staff.

    An exploration of critical topics in the anthropology, art, economics, history, literature, political science and sociology of Latin American and U.S. Latino contexts. Course features guest speakers from Cornell and other institutions.

  
  •  

    LATA 4010 - Experience Latin America: Rural and Urban Realities I

    (crosslisted)
    (also IARD 4010 )
    Spring. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    P. Hobbs.

    For description see IARD 4010 .

  
  
  •  

    LATA 4160 - Topics in Colonial Encounters

    (crosslisted)
    (also ARTH 4160  , VISST 4160 ) GHB (LA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Co-meets with

    A. Cohen-Suarez.

    For description, see ARTH 4160 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4170 - [Shipwrecks: Disaster, Deliverance, and Capitalism]

    (crosslisted)
    (also FREN 4170 , SPAN 4170 ) (LA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2014-2015. Conducted in English.

    G. Aching

    For description, see SPAN 4170 .

  
  
  •  

    LATA 4250 - Books of Fate, Books of the Ancestors: Astrology and History in Ancient Mesoamerica

    (crosslisted)
    (also ANTHR 4256 , ARKEO 4256 ) (GHB) (CA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    J. Henderson.

    For description, see ANTHR 4256 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4260 - [Social Movements in Latin America]

    (crosslisted)
    (also GOVT 4264 ) (GB) (SBA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2013-2014. Permission of instructor required. Co-meets with GOVT 6264 /LATA 6260 .

    K. Roberts.

    For description, see GOVT 4264 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4335 - Mexico: Politics, Economy, and Society

    (crosslisted)
    (also ILRIC 4335 , LSP 4335  )
    Fall. 4 credits.

    M. Cook.

    For description, see ILRIC 4335 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4500 - [Literature of the Conquest]

    (crosslisted)
    (also SPAN 4500 ) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: SPAN 2140 , SPAN 2150 , SPAN 2170 , or permission of instructor. Next offered 2014-2015. Conducted in Spanish. Co-meets with LATA 6500 /SPAN 6500 .

    M. A. Garcés.

    For description, see SPAN 4500 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4526 - Caribbean Dialogues: Online!

    (crosslisted)
    (also ARTH 4526 , VISST 4526 ) (GB) (CA-AS)
    Summer. 4 credits.

    P. Archer-Straw.

    For description, see ARTH 4526 .

  
  
  •  

    LATA 4601 - Politics and Social Change in the Caribbean

    (crosslisted)
    (also ASRC 4600 , GOVT 4606 ) (SBA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    L. Edmondson.

    For description, see ASRC 4600 .


  
  •  

    LATA 4710 - Cuisine, Production, and Biodiversity in Peru: From Local to Global, Part 1

    (crosslisted)
    (also ANTHR 4710 , IARD 4710 )
    Fall. 2 credits.

    B.J. Isbell.

    For description, see ANTHR 4710 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4712 - Cuisine, Production, and Biodiversity in Peru: From Local to Global, Part 2

    (crosslisted)
    (also ANTHR 4712 , IARD 4712 )
    Spring. 2-3 credits, variable.

    B.J. Isbell.

    For description, see ANTHR 4712 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4730 - Latin American Forms of Colonial Possession

    (crosslisted)
    (also ANTHR 4730 ) (GHB) (CA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    C. Garces.

    For description, see ANTHR 4730 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4910 - [Latin American Literature and Mass Media]

    (crosslisted)
    (also SPAN 4910 ) (CA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2014-2015.

    E. Paz-Soldan.

    For description, see SPAN 4910 .

  
  •  

    LATA 4970 - Independent Study in Latin American Studies


    Fall, winter, spring, summer. 1-3 credits, variable.

    Staff.

  
  •  

    LATA 6000 - Contemporary Issues in Latin-Latino America

    (crosslisted)
    (also LSP 6000 )
    Fall, spring. 1 credit.

    Co-meets with LATA 4000 /LSP 4000 .

    Staff.

    An exploration of critical topics in the anthropology, art, economics, history, literature, political science, and sociology of Latin American and U.S. Latino contexts. Course features guest speakers from Cornell and other institutions.

  
  •  

    LATA 6010 - Experience Latin America II (Chiapa Edition)

    (crosslisted)
    (also IARD 6010 )
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: IARD 4010  or LATA 4010 .

    P. Hobbs.

    For description see IARD 6010 .

  
  
  
  •  

    LATA 6210 - Crossing Borders: Migration in Comparative Perspective

    (crosslisted)
    (also  , LSP 6010 )
    Fall or spring. 4 credits.

    M. Cook.

    For description, please see ILRIC 6010 .

  
  
  •  

    LATA 6260 - [Social Movements in Latin America]

    (crosslisted)
    (also GOVT 6264 )
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2013-2014. Permission of instructor required. Co-meets with GOVT 4264 /LATA 4260 .

    K. Roberts.

    For description, see GOVT 6264 .

  
  •  

    LATA 6310 - Comparative Labor Movements in Latin America

    (crosslisted)
    (also ILRIC 6310 )
    Fall. 4 credits.

    M. Cook.

    For description, see ILRIC 6310 .

  
  •  

    LATA 6350 - [Indigenous Peoples and Globalization]

    (crosslisted)
    (also AIS 6350 , DSOC 6350 )
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Next offered 2014-2015. Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to: graduate students only.

    A. Gonzales.

    For description, see DSOC 6350 .

  
  •  

    LATA 6481 - Topics in Latin American History

    (crosslisted)
    (also HIST 6481 )
    Spring. 4 credits.

    R. Craib.

    For description, see HIST 6481 .

  
  •  

    LATA 6482 - [History/Geography/Theory]

    (crosslisted)
    (also HIST 6482 )
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2013-2014.

    R. Craib.

    For description, see HIST 6482 .

  
  •  

    LATA 6500 - [Literature of the Conquest]

    (crosslisted)
    (also SPAN 6500 )
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2014-2015. Conducted in Spanish. Co-meets with LATA 4500 /SPAN 4500 .

    M. A. Garces.

    For description, see SPAN 6500 .

  
  •  

    LATA 6570 - In the Break I: Chicana/o and African American Literature and Performance

    (crosslsted)
    (also ASRC 6570 ENGL 6570 , LSP 6570 , PMA 6816 )  
    Fall, (yearlong). 4 credits.

    This is a yearlong course. Students MUST enroll in LATA 6570 in the fall and LATA 6580  in the spring. Students will receive and “R” at the end of the fall semeser and a grade at the end of the year for both courses. The course is team-taught.

    M. Brady, M. Crawford.

    For description, see ENGL 6570 .

  
  •  

    LATA 6580 - In the Break II: Chicana/o and African American Literature and Performance

    (crosslisted)
    (also ASRC 6580 , ENGL 6580 , LSP 6580 , PMA 6817 )
    Spring (yearlong). 4 credits.

    This is a yearlong course. Students MUST enroll in LATA 6570  in the fall and LATA 6580 in the spring. Students will receive an “R” at the end of the fall semester and a grade at the end of the year for both courses. The course is team-taught.

    M. Brady, M. Crawford.

    For description, see ENGL 6580 .

  

LATIN—Latin

  
  •  

    LATIN 1201 - Elementary Latin I


    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Staff.

    Introductory course designed to prepare students to start reading Latin prose at the end of a year. The class moves swiftly and includes extensive memorization of vocabulary and paradigms; study of Latin syntax; and written homework, quizzes, tests, and oral drills.

  
  •  

    LATIN 1202 - Elementary Latin II


    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden Overlap: Students may not receive credit for both LATIN 1202 and LATIN 1204 .
    Prerequisite: LATIN 1201  or equivalent. Students should be ready for LATIN 1205  by the end of the course, but may take LATIN 2201  if they pass with A– or better.

    Staff.

    Continuation of LATIN 1201 , using readings from various authors; prepares students for LATIN 1205 .

  
  •  

    LATIN 1203 - Intensive Latin


    Summer. 6 credits. Letter grades only.

    Staff.

    Intensive introduction that quickly instills the essentials of Latin grammar before progressing to readings in the original Latin. Prepares students in a single term for LATIN 1205 . Students may take LATIN 2201  if they pass with A- or better.

  
  •  

    LATIN 1204 - Latin in Review


    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden Overlap: Students may not receive credit for both LATIN 1202  and LATIN 1204.
    Prerequisite: placement by departmental examination.

    A. Ruppel.

    Designed to accommodate students who have had some Latin, but are insufficiently prepared to take LATIN 1202 . It begins with review of some material covered in LATIN 1201  and then continues with second-term Latin material (LATIN 1202 ). The class moves swiftly and includes extensive memorization of vocabulary and paradigms; study of Latin syntax; and written homework, quizzes, tests, and oral drills. Students should be ready for LATIN 1205  by the end of the course, but may take LATIN 2201  if they pass with A– or better.

  
  •  

    LATIN 1205 - Intermediate Latin I


    Fall, spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisites: LATIN 1202 , LATIN 1203 , LATIN 1204  or placement by departmental exam.

    Fall, D. Mankin; spring, A. Ruppel.

    Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (Ovid, Ars Amatoria I.) Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202 , LATIN 1203 , LATIN 1204 .

  
  •  

    LATIN 2201 - Latin Prose


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: LATIN 1205  or grade of A– or above in LATIN 1202 , LATIN 1203 , LATIN 1204  or placement by departmental exam.

    C. Brittain.

    “Reading of Cicero’s De Senectute – his examination of value of life (sex, friends, intellectual interests?) and the nature of death (extinction or survival?), written in 44 BCE, the year before his own violent death. We will read this dialogue with close attention to both its grammatical details and its thought-provoking content.”

  
  •  

    LATIN 2202 - Ovid: Erotic Poetry


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: LATIN 1205  or grade of A- or above in LATIN 1202 , LATIN 1203 , LATIN 1204  or placement by departmental exam.

    A. Ruppel.

    Ovid’s erotic poetry is relatively easy to translate but rich in its literary structure and influence.

  
  •  

    LATIN 2203 - Catullus


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: LATIN 1205  or grade of A- or above in LATIN 1202 , LATIN 1203 , LATIN 1204 , or placement by departmental exam.

    P. Pucci.

    The aim of the course is to present the poems of Catullus within their cultural and poetical context. The poems will be read and translated, and their significance both individually and in relation to the poetic context will be discussed in class. Some selections from the works of Catullus’ contemporaries will be assigned in translation.

  
  •  

    LATIN 2204 - [Roman Drama]


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: LATIN 1205  or grade of A- or above in LATIN 1202 LATIN 1203 LATIN 1204 , or placement by departmental exam. Next offered 2013–2014.

    Staff.

    Topic: TBA.

  
  •  

    LATIN 2205 - [Virgil]


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: LATIN 1205  or grade of A- or above in LATIN 1202 LATIN 1203 LATIN 1204 , or placement by departmental exam. Next offered 2014-2015.

    Staff.

    We will read in Latin selections from Virgil’s Eclogues and Georgics and, in English translation, selections from his chief Greek models, Theocritus and Hesiod. Discussion will focus on the poems in their historical and literary context and on Virgil’s language, meter, and poetic technique.

  
  •  

    LATIN 2206 - [Roman Letters]


    (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: LATIN 1205  or grade of A- or above in LATIN 1202 , LATIN 1203 , LATIN 1204  or placement by departmental exam. Next offered 2014-2015.

    Staff.

    Topic: TBD.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3201 - [Roman Epic]


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Fall. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: 2000-level Latin. Next offered 2013-2014.

    Staff.

    Undergraduate seminar.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3202 - Roman Historiography


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: one term of 2000-level Latin or permission of instructor.

    C. Roby.

    Ovid’s Fasti takes the reader through the first half of the Roman year in six books, tracking the terrestrial and celestial activities – festivals, myths, star movements, and politics – that situate the events of Roman history within a cosmic cycle. We will examine the poem’s unusual language and “cinematic style” in the context of its Greek and Roman poetic predecessors, as well as exploring its rich aetiology of Roman ritual. A recent explosion of critical interest in the poem provides a wealth of secondary literature, which we will use to read the poem against the backdrop of contemporary Roman literature and politics, science, religion, and mythmaking.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3203 - [Roman Poetry]


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Fall. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: one 2000-level Latin course. Next offered 2013-2014.

    Staff.

    Undergraduate seminar. Topic: TBD.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3204 - [Roman Prose]


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: one 2000-level Latin course. Next offered 2013-2014.

    Staff.

    Undergraduate seminar.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3206 - [Lucretius]


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: one 2000-level Latin course. Next offered 2014-2015.

    C. Roby.

    Reading in Latin of selections from Lucretius’s De Rerum Natura, his poetic exploration of Epicurean philosophy via atomic physics. We will approach this multifaceted work from many different perspectives, reading it as a philosophical text, a poetic experiment, and a guide to achieving tranquility of mind. Close reading of the Latin text will be complemented by secondary readings and short in-class presentations.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3207 - Roman Comedy: Plautus


    (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: LATIN 2204  or above, or placement by departmental examination.

    M. Fontaine.

    A close reading of two Roman comedies, Menaechmi and Mostellaria, by T. Maccius Plautus. Graduate students will be expected to read three additional comedies. Substantial attention will also be given to secondary readings and mastery of the basic Latin meters.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3215 - [Imperial Latin]


    (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: one semester of 2000-level Latin. Next offered 2013–2014.

    Staff.

    Undergraduate Latin seminar. Topic: TBD.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3217 - [Latin Prose Composition]


    (HB) (LA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: one semester of 2000-level Latin. Next offered 2013–2014.

    Staff.

  
  •  

    LATIN 3286 - Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level


    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable.

    Prerequisite: permission of DUS in special circumstances only.

    Staff.

  
  •  

    LATIN 4201 - [Advanced Readings in Latin Literature]


    (HB) (LA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: one semester of 3000-level Latin. Next offered 2013-2014.

    Staff.

    Topic: TBD.

  
  •  

    LATIN 4202 - [Advanced Readings in Latin Literature]


    (HB) (LA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: one semester of 3000-level Latin. Next offered 2013–2014.

    Staff.

    Topic: TBD.

  
  •  

    LATIN 4203 - [Survey of Latin Literature]


    (HB) (LA-AS)


    Fall. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: one semester of 3000-level Latin or permission of the instructor. Next offered 2014-2015.

    Staff.

    Topic: TBD.

     

  
  •  

    LATIN 4204 - [Survey of Latin Literature]


    (HB) (LA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: one semester of 3000-level Latin or permission of the instructor. Next offered 2014-2015.

    Staff.

    Topic: TBD.

  
  •  

    LATIN 4213 - Survey of Medieval Latin Literature

    (crosslisted)
    (also MEDVL 4103 ) (HB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1.
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Co-meets with LATIN 7213 /MEDVL 6103 .

    A. Hicks.

    For description, see MEDVL 4103 .

  
  •  

    LATIN 4216 - [Advanced Latin Prose Composition]


    (HB) (LA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: graduate standing; undergraduates who have completed LATIN 3217  and have permission of instructor. Next offered 2014-2015.

    Staff.

  
  •  

    LATIN 4223 - [Topics in Medieval Latin Literature]

    (crosslisted)
    (also MEDVL 4201 ) (HB) (LA-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2013-2014. Co-meets with LATIN 7223 /MEDVL 6201 .

    A. Hicks.

    For description, see MEDVL 4201 .

  
  •  

    LATIN 4452 - [Latin Comparative Grammar]

    (crosslisted)
    (also LING 4452 ) (KCM-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: thorough familiarity with morphology of classical Latin. Next offered 2013–2014.

    A. Nussbaum.

    The prehistory and evolution of the sounds and forms of Classical Latin as reconstructed by comparison with the other Indo-European languages.

  
  •  

    LATIN 4453 - [Structure of Latin]

    (crosslisted)
    (also LING 4453 , ROMS 4453 ) (KCM-AS)
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: a basic knowledge of Latin forms and constructins or some previous work in Romance and/or general linguistics. Cannot be used toward the language course major requirement.

    A. Nussbaum.

    For description, see LING 4453 .

  
  •  

    LATIN 4456 - [Archaic Latin]

    (crosslisted)
    (also LING 4456 ) (HB) (LA-AS)
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Latin. Next offered 2014–2015.

    Staff.

    Reading of epigraphic and literary pre-Classical texts with special attention to archaic and dialectal features.

  
  
  •  

    LATIN 7222 - Latin Paleography

    (crosslisted)
    (also MEDVL 6102 )
    Spring. 4 credits.

    A. Hicks.

    For description, see MEDVL 6102 .

  
  •  

    LATIN 7223 - [Topics in Medieval Latin Literature]

    (crosslisted)
    (also MEDVL 6201 )
    Fall. 4 credits.

    Next offered 2013-2014. Co-meets with LATIN 4223 /MEDVL 4201 .

    A. Hicks.

    For description, see MEDVL 6201 .

  
  
  •  

    LATIN 7271 - Graduate Seminar in Latin


    Fall. 4 credits.

    Enrollment limited to: graduate students.

    C. Roby.

    Topic: Vitruvius’s De architectura
    The course is intended to combine serious attention to the technical content of the De architectura with broader-based thinking about private, public, and natural spaces in the Roman world, and to look at Vitruvius’s strategies for engaging with Greek knowledge and literature and reshaping them for a non-technical Roman audience.

  
  •  

    LATIN 7272 - Graduate Seminar in Latin


    Spring. 4 credits.

    Graduate students only.

    F. Ahl.

    Topic: Virgil.

  
  •  

    LATIN 7920 - Independent Study in Latin


    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable.

    Staff.


LAW—Law

  
  •  

    LAW 3281 - [Constitutional Politics: The U.S. Supreme Court]


    Spring. 4 credits. S-U or letter grade option.

    Next offered 2013-2014. Undergraduates only.

    This course investigates the United States Supreme Court and its role in politics and government. It traces the development of constitutional doctrine, the growth of the Court’s institutional power, and the Court’s interaction with Congress, the president, and society. Discussed are major constitutional law decisions, their political contexts, and the social and behavioral factors that affect judges, justices, and federal court jurisprudence.

  
  •  

    LAW 4021 - Competition Law and Policy


    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: This course requires no legal training or background but ECON 1110  (Elementary Microeconomics) or its equivalent is a prerequisite. The course can be used by Economics majors as an equivalent to a 4000-level Economics course. Undergraduates only.

    G. A. Hay.

    The course will start with actual cases arising under U.S. antitrust law and will discuss the legal, economic and policy issues that are raised. The course is intended for and limited to non-law students; law students interested in the subject should take the Antitrust Law course.

  
  •  

    LAW 4041 - Crime, Politics, and Law


    Fall. 4 credits.

    Enrollment limited to: undergraduate students. Satisfies the writing requirement.

    D. M. Chutkow.

    The Constitution and the federal courts have much to say about the power of government to investigate, detain, prosecute, sentence, and punish individuals for crime. This course examines the major legal decisions that shape constitutional law with respect to crime, and how the balance is struck between the presumption of innocence, the protection of the individual, and the government’s duty to enforce the laws and ensure public safety.

  
  •  

    LAW 4051 - The Death Penalty in America


    Spring. 4 credits. S-U or letter grade option.

    Undergraduates only.

    J. H. Blume, S. L. Johnson, K. M. Weyble. Undergraduates only.

    The death penalty has gotten increased media attention due to high profile death row exonerations, and has long been under siege for other reasons, such as racial disparities in its imposition and the prevalence of very poor representation by defense counsel. This course surveys the legal and social issues that arise in the administration of the death penalty. The reading will be largely comprised of reported death penalty cases, but will be augmented by a variety of other sources, including empirical studies of the death penalty and the litigation experience of the professors. Although the focus will be on capital punishment as practiced in the United States, we will also consider international and comparative perspectives. Guest speakers will provide a range of views, and law students with experience working on capital cases will lead discussion sections.

  
  •  

    LAW 4121 - [Gender, Public Policy, and Law]


    Fall or spring. 4 credits. S-U or letter grade option.

    Next offered 2013-2014. Undergraduates only.

    Staff.

    Provides a brief introduction to the history of the women’s movement in the United States and to the development of the constitutional standard for gender, followed by a sampling of the competing theoretical approaches that can be taken to legal problems involving gender—a formal equality approach, the dominance approach (exemplified by Catharine MacKinnon), relational or cultural feminism (a “differences” approach represented in the legal academy by Robin West and Mary Becker), socialist feminism, pragmatic feminism, and critical race feminism. After the constitutional and theoretical foundations have been laid, we study a series of issues and issue areas where gender is critical to legal treatment—reproduction (e.g., abortion, surrogate motherhood, and other reproductive technologies), rape, domestic violence, prostitution, pornography, cohabitation, same-sex marriage, and other family law issues. We study how these issues are treated under current law and discuss what might be better approaches to each. To introduce students to the study of law, we use a textbook used in law school courses, Becker, Bowman, Nourse, and Yuracko, Feminist Jurisprudence: Taking Women Seriously (3d ed. 2007). No prior knowledge of legal analysis or concepts is presumed. Requirements: two five-page papers and a final exam.

  
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    LAW 4122 - Judging the Jury


    Spring. 4 credits. S-U or letter grade option.

    Undergraduates only.

    V. Hans.

    The American jury is praised by some as an important symbol of democracy, yet sharply criticized by others as incompetent and biased. This course evaluates claims about the strengths and limitations of the contemporary American jury. We will examine the image of the jury in popular culture, then explore the work of lawyers, legal scholars, psychologists, and other social scientists who have studied the jury in depth. Questions we’ll address during the course include: Do juries represent all segments of their communities? Can lawyers stack a jury in their favor? Are jurors influenced by the “CSI effect?” What should judges do about googling and tweeting jurors? How do jurors use trial evidence and legal rules to decide on verdicts, damage awards, or decisions to sentence a defendant to death? By the course’s end, students should be able to reach their own informed judgment about this perennially controversial institution.

  
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    LAW 4131 - The Nature, Functions, and Limits of Law

    (crosslisted)
    (also GOVT 3131 )


    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Enrollment limited to: undergraduate students.

    D. M. Chutkow.

    A general-education course to acquaint students with how our legal system pursues the goals of society. The course introduces students to various perspectives on the nature of law, what functions it ought to serve in society, and what it can and cannot accomplish. The course proceeds in the belief that such matters constitute a valuable and necessary part of a general education, not only for pre-law students but especially for students in other fields. Assigned readings comprise legal materials and also secondary sources on the legal process and the role of law in society. The classes include discussion and debate about current legal and social issues, including equality, safety, the environment, punishment, and autonomy.

     

  
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    LAW 5001 - Civil Procedure


    Fall, spring. (yearlong) 6 credits. Letter grades only.

    K. M. Clermont, B. J. Holden-Smith, F. Rossi

    An introduction to civil litigation, from commencement of an action through disposition on appeal, studied in the context of the federal procedural system. Also, a detailed consideration of federalism and ascertainment of applicable law; jurisdiction, process, and venue; and former adjudication.

  
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    LAW 5021 - Constitutional Law


    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    J. Chafetz, S. L. Johnson, B. Meyler, A. Rana, N. Tebbe.

    A study of basic American constitutional law, including structural aspects of the Constitution and certain of its rights provisions.

  
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    LAW 5041 - Contracts


    Fall, spring. (yearlong) 6 credits. Letter grades only.

    T. Eisenberg, R. A. Hillman, J. J. Rachlinski.

    An introduction to the nature, functions, and processes of exchange, contract, and contract law. The course focuses on the predominant rules and principles governing contract and related obligation, including the substantive reasons underlying the rules and principles.

  
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    LAW 5061 - Criminal Law


    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    S. P. Garvey, J. Ohlin.

    An introductory study of the criminal law, including theories of punishment, analysis of the elements of criminal liability and available defenses, and consideration of specific crimes as defined by statute and the common law.

  
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    LAW 5081 - Lawyering


    Fall, spring. (yearlong) 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    J. Atlas, L. Freed, A. J. Mooney, M. A. Whelan, T. Smith, C. Weyble.

    Lawyering is a full-year course designed to introduce first-year students to lawyering skills, with primary emphasis on legal writing, analysis, research, and oral presentations. Assignments are usually set in the context of a simulated law office (or judge’s chambers). In the fall semester, students write predictive memoranda that point out the strengths and weaknesses of their client’s case. To prepare the memoranda, students may need to determine the facts of the case by conducting interviews or depositions. Acting as junior attorneys, students will also make an oral presentation to a supervising attorney. The spring semester focuses on persuasive advocacy. Students prepare a memorandum, motion, or brief for submission to a court and, later, orally argue for their positions in a simulated court session. Throughout the year, students also learn the fundamentals of legal research. Instruction occurs not only in full-class sessions but also in individual conferences. Students receive extensive feedback on each major assignment.

  
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    LAW 5121 - Property


    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    T. J. McSweeney, E. L. Sherwin, L. S. Underkuffler.

    This is a course in basic property law. It covers acquisitions of rights in property, estates in land, concurrent ownership, landlord/tenant relations, and regulation of land use.

  
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    LAW 5151 - Torts


    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    M. Frakes, M. Heise, J. A. Henderson Jr., W. B. Wendel.

    An introduction to the principles of civil liability in the tort field: intentional wrongs, negligence, and strict liability. Attention is also given to the processes by which tort disputes are handled in our legal system.

  
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    LAW 6001 - Accounting for Lawyers


    Spring. 2 credits. S-U or letter grade option.

    Enrollment is limited to: students who have had no more than six credit hours of accounting (or its equivalent) or permission of instructor. The course is intended primarily for students with little or no prior background in bookkeeping or accounting.

    R. A. Sarachan.

    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts and fundamentals of financial accounting. It will focus on (1) accrual accounting concepts, principles and conventions, (2) the presentation of financial statements (balance sheets, income statements, statements of cash flow), (3) the interpretation and analysis of financial statements, and (4) the use and misuse of accounting information. The goal of the course is to enable students to critically review a company’s financial statements.

  
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    LAW 6011 - Administrative Law: The Law of the Regulatory State


    Fall, spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Limited enrollment.

    J. J. Rachlinski [fall], C. R. Farina [spring].

    An introduction to the constitutional and other legal issues posed by the modern administrative state. Topics include: procedural due process, separation of powers, procedural modes of administrative policymaking; judicial review of agency action; and the oversight and control relationships between agencies and Congress or the President. The course provides a working familiarity with the fundamentals of administrative procedure, as well as a larger inquiry into the role of agencies in our constitutional system - and the effect of legal doctrine on shaping that role.

     

  
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    LAW 6019 - Dispute Resolution Practicum

    (crosslisted)
    (also ILRLR 6019  )
    Spring. 4 credits.

    D. Lipsky and R. Scanza.

    For description, see ILRLR 6019  .

  
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    LAW 6051 - Advanced Legal Research in Business Law


    Fall. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: Lawyering or Advanced Legal Research: US Legal Research for LLMs. Satisfies skills requirement. Limited enrollment. Course meets the first half of the semester.

    M. Morrison.

    Business issues, particularly those relating to corporations, are a given in most areas of practice. This course will introduce students to online resources providing company information and will enable them to evaluate the information in order to determine whether the resource is the most appropriate for their research. Students will learn how to find what the company says about itself (required filings, annual statements, web pages, press releases), what regulators say about the company (legal and administrative actions, regulations), and what third parties have to say (analysts, ratings services, directories, news and journal articles). Classes are short lectures followed by online sessions using business databases. There are assigned readings in lieu of a required textbook, five assignments, and a short due diligence report on a company of the student’s choice. There is no final exam.

  
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    LAW 6071 - Advanced Legal Research: United States Legal Research for LL.M. Students


    Fall. 1 credit. Graduate program grading – HH, H, S, U.

    Enrollment limited to: graduate students. Attendance is mandatory at the first class session.  Limited enrollment. Course meets first 7 weeks of the term.

    F. Cadmus.

    This course will introduce LL.M. students to basic legal research in U.S. materials that will be valuable to them in their course work at Cornell and in practice. The focus will be on understanding and finding primary legal sources, including statutory codes, session laws, administrative regulations, and court decisions, as well as explanatory materials, such as law reviews and treatises.

  
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    LAW 6075 - [Advanced Topics in International Law]


    Spring. 2 credits.

    Prerequisite: LAW 6545  or LAW 6791  or permission of the instructor. Next offered 2013-2014.


    C. Thomas.

    This course will focus on select aspects of international law that help to shape contemporary global governance, but that are not generally covered by conventional international law courses, such as: international trade law as it affects the global South, international law combating organized crime, and international law on movement of persons. Central inquiries will rest on the efficacy and justice of international legal rules and practices. The course will begin with an overview of competing schools of thought related to international law, and will proceed with a series of case studies. Final grades will be based on class participation, a paper, and a brief in-class presentation on the paper topic.

     

 

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