The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
Courses of Study 2015-2016
Cornell University
   
 
    
 
  Jan 19, 2018
 
Courses of Study 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 

AAS—Asian American Studies

  
  •  

    AAS 1100 - Introduction to Asian American Studies


    (CA-AS)      
    Spring. 3 credits.

    C. Lau.

    This course examines the historical and contemporary issues of Asian Americans from the 1960s Civil Rights Era to the current moment of what has been termed the Post-Racial Era of the 21st century. We will analyze major themes such as race and class relations, gender and the family, immigration and globalization, religion and community activism. In the first half of this course, we will learn fundamental concepts and ideas by examining major events, including the Asian American Movement, the murder of Vincent Chin, and the LA Uprisings. In the second half of this course, we will examine how race and gender relations change alongside contemporary moments of globalization and the economy through a variety of topics including interracial marriages, refugees and welfare, the Tiger Mother, and affirmative action.

  
  •  

    AAS 2100 - [South Asian Diaspora]

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 2410 
    (GHB) (CA-AS) (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. Not offered 2015-2016. 4 credits.

    V. Munasinghe.

    This interdisciplinary course (with an emphasis in anthropology) will introduce students to the multiple routes/roots, lived experiences, and imagined worlds of South Asians who have traveled to various lands at different historical moments spanning Fiji, South Africa, Mauritius, Britain, Malaysia, United States, Trinidad, and even within South Asia itself such as the Tamil-speaking population of Sri Lanka. The course will begin with the labor migrations of the 1830s and continue up to the present period. The primary exercise will be to compare and contrast the varied expressions of the South Asian Diaspora globally in order to critically evaluate this transnational identity. Thus, we will ask what, if any, are the ties that bind a fifth-generation Indo-Trinidadian whose ancestor came to the New World as an indentured laborer or “coolie” in the mid-19th century to labor in the cane fields, to a Pakistani medical doctor who migrated to the United States in the late 1980s. If Diaspora violates a sense of identity based on territorial integrity, then could “culture” serve as the basis for a shared identity?

  
  •  

    AAS 2130 - Introduction to Asian American History

    (crosslisted) AMST 2640 , HIST 2640  
    (HA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits.

    C. Lau.

    For description, see HIST 2640 .

  
  •  

    AAS 2620 - Introduction to Asian American Literature

    (crosslisted) AMST 2620 , ENGL 2620 
    (LA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits.

    S. Wong.

    For description, see ENGL 2620 .

  
  •  

    AAS 2910 - It’s All Chinese to Me

    (crosslisted) AMST 2910 , ENGL 2910  
    (CA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits.

    S. Wong.

    In her memoir Woman Warrior, Maxine Hong Kingston identified a conundrum familiar to many US-born children of Chinese immigrants when she asked: “What is Chinese tradition and what is the movies?” What is “Chinese tradition”? Does it mean the same thing to people in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore, or to Chinese diasporic communities in North America?  Does “Chineseness” change across time and space? While there will be occasion to discuss what “Chineseness” means in different Asian contexts, this course will focus primarily on how ideas of “China” and “Chineseness” have been historically constructed by, for, and in the West—particularly in the US. Course materials include readings on the concept of “Chineseness,” Chinese American literature and film, and historical studies of East/West relations.

  
  •  

    AAS 3030 - [Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective]

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 3703  
    (HB) (CA-AS)      
    Fall. Next offered 2016-2017. 4 credits.

    V. Munasinghe.

    For description, see ANTHR 3703 .

  
  
  •  

    AAS 3515 - The Asian American Middle Class

    (crosslisted) HIST 3515 
    (HA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits.

    C. Lau.

    The Asian American middle class is defined by having a certain level of education, bourgeoisie sets of manners, investment in home ownership, professional qualifications such as a doctor or an engineer, and participation in popular culture. This course takes a historical, cultural, and social perspective of the rise of the Asian American Middle Class from the late nineteenth century to the current day. How did Asian Americans become part of the American middle class? Did the middle class experience racism differently compared to the working class? And although many Asian Americans strived to belong to the middle class, what are the limits of middle-class Asian American politics and lifestyle? We will cover topics such as immigration, imperialism, family politics, second generation, popular culture, model minority, education, and suicides.

  
  •  

    AAS 3580 - Twentieth Century Women Writers of Color in the Americas

    (crosslisted) AMST 3580 , ENGL 3580 , FGSS 3581  
    (LA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits.

    S. Wong.

    For description, see ENGL 3580 .

  
  •  

    AAS 4310 - Mind, Self, and Emotion

    (crosslisted) COGST 4350 , HD 4310 
    (SBA-AS)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: HD 1150  or HD 1170  or PSYCH 1101 . Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to: upper-class undergraduate or graduate standing.

    Q. Wang.

    For description, see HD 4310 .

  
  •  

    AAS 4509 - Temporalities of Empire, Nation and Colonial Difference

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 4109 , SHUM 4509  
         
    Spring. 4 credits.

    Enrollment limited to: 15 students.

    V. Munasinghe.

    For description, see SHUM 4509 .

  
  
  •  

    AAS 4790 - [Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective]

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 4479  
    (SBA-AS)      
    Fall. Next offered 2016-2017. 4 credits.

    Co-meets with AAS 7479 /ANTHR 7479 .

    V. Munasinghe.

    For description, see ANTHR 4479 .

  
  •  

    AAS 4950 - Independent Study


    (CU-UGR)     
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable.

    Topic and credit hours TBA as arranged between faculty and student. Independent study forms must be approved by Asian American Studies Program office.

    Staff.

  
  •  

    AAS 4970 - [Jim Crow and Exclusion-Era America]

    (crosslisted) AMST 4970 , HIST 4970  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2017-2018. 4 credits.

    Co-meets with AMST 6970 /HIST 6970 .

    D. Chang.

    For description, see HIST 4970 .

  
  
  •  

    AAS 7479 - [Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective]

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 7479  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2016-2017. 4 credits.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4479 /AAS 4790 .

    V. Munasinghe.

    For description, see ANTHR 7479 .


AEM—Applied Economics & Management

  
  •  

    AEM 1106 - FWS: Topics in Applied Economics and Management


         


    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    First-Year Writing Seminar.

    The Dyson School offers first-year writing seminars on a wide range of Applied Economics and Management topics. Topics vary by section.

    Topics for 2015-2016 may include:

    Fall 2015          FWS: Economics and the Environment        A. Waxman
    Fall 2015 FWS: Food Systems in the Developing World: Health, Poverty, Opportunity L. Bevis

     

  
  •  

    AEM 1200 - Introduction to Business Management


         
    Spring, summer. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    P. D. Perez.

    Provides an overview of management and business. Human resource, marketing, finance, and strategy concerns are addressed with consideration paid to current issues such as technological innovation and its impact on operations, globalization, ethics, teamwork, leadership, and entrepreneurship. Opportunity to deliver an integrative group project.

  
  •  

    AEM 1201 - Business Management


         
    Summer. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Staff.

    Provides an overview of management and business. Human resource, marketing, finance, and strategy concerns are addressed with consideration paid to current issues such as technological innovation and its impact on operations, globalization, ethics, teamwork, leadership, and entrepreneurship. Opportunity to deliver an integrative group project.

  
  •  

    AEM 1210 - [Entrepreneurial Thought Leadership Seminar]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2015-2016. 1 credit.

    D. Streeter.

    Using various formats for each 2-hour session (debate, panel, case study), the course serves as an introduction to some of the key issues in the field of entrepreneurship. The course materials, readings, and guest speakers will touch on such questions as: Is entrepreneurship different than small business? What is the best way to fund a business? Can one person lead a business through all its stages of growth (seed, startup, growth, exit)? In addition, the course will expose participants to the ideas of thoughtful leaders in for-profit and non-profit sectors, about new business models that are being used to create and grow new companies in the “connected world”. Pathways and career options in the entrepreneurial ecosystem will be illustrated and discussed. Throughout, students will participate actively by leading discussions, presenting cases, contributing to breakout sessions, and reflecting on course materials.

    Outcome 1: Develop effective communication skills.

    Outcome 2: Attain analytical and functional competency in basic business and economic skills.

    Outcome 3: Demonstrate working knowledge of ethics and ability to apply to real world settings.

    Outcome 4: Demonstrate ability to solve practical business and economic problems and make an impact in real world and society.

    Outcome 5: Develop skills to be critical consumers of business and economic information and research.

  
  •  

    AEM 1220 - Entrepreneurship in the Life Sciences: Past, Present, and Future


         
    Fall. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    R. Karpman.

    The purpose of AEM 1220 is to introduce students into the world of entrepreneurship in the life sciences through the eyes of experienced life science entrepreneurs. The class will be presented as a lecture series given by well-known and respected entrepreneurs and faculty. Topics to be discussed include: • Differences between scientific investigation and entrepreneurship. • The beginnings of life science entrepreneurship. • Balancing a scientific and entrepreneurial career. • Entrepreneurship in the health professions. • The role and value of life science incubators. • Intellectual property: What is it? And how to protect it! • Ethical issues in life science entrepreneurship. • What areas in the life sciences are ripe for entrepreneurial ventures. • Academia and entrepreneurship. Students will be graded on attendance, questions derived from the lectures and a brief book review.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to explain the difference between scientific investigation and entrepreneurship.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to identify key characteristics of a successful life science entrepreneur.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to explain the changes in entrepreneurial activities throughout the centuries.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to explain future entrepreneurial opportunities in the health professions and life sciences.

  
  •  

    AEM 1221 - Entrepreneurship In The Life Science II


         
    Spring. 1 credit. Letter grades only (no audit).

    R. Karpman.

    This lecture series presented by faculty and experts in their disciplines is intended to introduce undergraduate students to the requirements that lead to a successful start-up company. Topics in the series include developing and honing your idea, developing a problem statement and value proposition, protecting intellectual property, sources of funding, business structures, the regulatory environment and making a successful pitch.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to explain the complexities involved in creating a start-up business in bio-technology and the life sciences.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to identify if their technology can become intellectual property.

    Outcome 3: Students will become conversant with dilutive and non-dilutive funding sources.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to articulate their idea in a clear and concise fashion and develop an appropriate value proposition.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to identify and seek assistance from faculty members throughout the University who have knowledge and skills within the entrepreneurship arena to advance their ideas.

  
  •  

    AEM 1230 - Foundations of Entrepreneurship and Business


         
    Fall. 2 credits.

    P. D. Perez.

    Introductory course providing a sound base to both the understanding of entrepreneurial activity and possibilities and the study and practice of entrepreneurship at Cornell. Emphasis on the identification and elaboration of business opportunities (i.e., business ideas). Extensive use of IT-based learning and presentation tools.

  
  •  

    AEM 1240 - Rose Scholars Program


         
    Fall, spring. 1 credit. S-U grades only (no audit).

    G. Blalock.

    The Rose Scholars program in an interdisciplinary course targeted at residents of Flora Rose House, but open to all. The program requires weekly participation in one of about five guided trips, workshops, discussions, lectures, and performances in social sciences, natural sciences, arts, humanities, and other fields. Participants reflect on their experiences with weekly digital media postings. The program is designed to introduce participants to the breadth of intellectual resources and activities on the Cornell campus and in the nearby community.

    Outcome 1: Students will understand and appreciate topics that may be new and unfamiliar.

    Outcome 2: Students will build the capacity to identify and capitalize on intellectual opportunities.

  
  •  

    AEM 1260 - Business Inclusion and Diversity Skills


         
    Spring. 2 credits.

    C. van Es, C. Thompson.

    This course will focus on academic achievement, emotional intelligence skills, identity awareness, global-business practices, cross-cultural communication and professional development. Strength Finders 2.0 will be used throughout the class as a building block for progress. Speakers from a variety of industries share their paths to success. It will have one joint lecture, and breakout sections stratified by self-selected student affiliations.

    Outcome 1: Acquire skills in cross-cultural team building.

    Outcome 2: Examine global business practices.

    Outcome 3: Critically investigate identity awareness.

  
  •  

    AEM 1300 - Macroeconomic Policy and the 2016 Election: Introduction to the Issues and How to Analyze Them


         
    Summer. 3 credits.

    Forbidden Overlap: ECON 1120 .
    Prerequisites: simple algebra and a basic knowledge of recent US history.

    S. Kyle.

    This course is an introduction to macroeconomic analysis at the college level and the issues that are most important to the national debate culminating in the 2016 election. A simple model of the macroeconomy is introduced and then used to illuminate these issues through examination of empirical data. Among the topics covered are: How Big Should the Government Be and Should We Care About the Government Deficit? Who Should We Tax and How Much? Social Security – What Is It and Should You Care? Health Insurance and Obamacare The European Crisis – The Difference between Spain and Florida Inflation and the Zero Lower Bound To Regulate or Not? The Crash of 2009 – Déjà Vu All Over Again? Immigration and Economic Growth China and the US Income Distribution.

    Outcome 1: Identify the basic structure of the US Economy.

    Outcome 2: Explain a simple macroeconomic model of how the economy works to generate growth and employment.

    Outcome 3: Illustrate how macroeconomic aggregates (such as GDP, inflation, employment) are measured.

    Outcome 4: Identify data sources for macroeconomic variables.

    Outcome 5: Use all of the above to critique important macroeconomic issues of the present time.

  
  •  

    AEM 1500 - An Introduction to the Economics of Environmental and Natural Resources


    (SBA) (CU-SBY)     
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Forbidden Overlap: AEM 2500 . Students who have already taken Introductory Microeconomics should enroll in AEM 2500 .
    Prerequisite: MATH 1106  or MATH 1110  or equivalent. Enrollment limited to: Non-Dyson School students. Enrollment preference given to: ESS majors.

    G. Poe.

    This course provides an introduction to the economic foundations for public decision-making regarding environmental quality and natural resources. Emphasis is placed on how basic tools of economic analysis can be used to identify sources of environmental problems and solutions to these problems. Topics to be covered include “individual hand” concepts underlying market success, market failure with particular focus on public goods and externalities, benefit-cost analysis and non-market valuation, incentive-based policies for controlling pollution, and economic aspects of renewable and non-renewable resources.

    Outcome 1: Understand how economic incentives influence individual and group behavior and how this knowledge can be used to explain and address environmental challenges.

    Outcome 2: Develop the ability to identify the range of potential economic costs and benefits of a particular environmental policy and the array of economic tools that can be used to estimate these costs and benefits.

    Outcome 3: Improve critical thinking skills to assess the tradeoffs inherent to a broad range of contemporary environmental issues.

  
  •  

    AEM 2000 - Contemporary Controversies in the Global Economy


         
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: ECON 1110 . Recommended prerequisite: ECON 1120 . Enrollment preference given to: Dyson/AEM majors, in particular sophomores and juniors, but all majors welcomed.

    C. B. Barrett.

    This course aims to stimulate critical thinking, economic reasoning, and cogent writing about contemporary controversies that attract regular attention in the international press and among key private and public sector decision-makers. Students read and discuss competing arguments about current issues such as morally questionable market exchange among willing buyres and sellers, immigration policy, foreign aid, sovereign debt forgiveness, regulating genetically modified foods, etc. Students write, edit, and rewrite short briefing papers which are evaluated for quality of communication as well as subject matter content.

    Outcome 1: Student will demonstrate proficiency in written communication.

    Outcome 2: Student will demonstrate competency in analysis of ethical problems in business or economics in both domestic and international contexts.

    Outcome 3: Student will be able to identify and analyze evidence pertaining to business and economics problems in society and communicate results.

    Outcome 4: Student will develop an awareness and understanding of the cultural issues that impact business operations in a global society.

    Outcome 5: Student will be able to demonstrate familiarity with major business and economics issues facing a firm and society.

    Outcome 6: Student will demonstrate ability to offer critical analysis of a variety of contemporary business issues.

  
  •  

    AEM 2010 - Spreadsheet Modeling for Management and Economics


         
    Fall, spring, summer, winter. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Enrollment required of and limited to Dyson/AEM majors in the Fall and Spring. Course is open to all non-Dyson majors during summer and winter session.

    D. Haeger.

    This course will be developed as a data-driven, model-based approach to decision-making. Most applications will rely on the standard array of Excel functionality but other platforms (e.g., Access, SQL, presentation software) may be employed. A unique feature of this course will be applications drawn from the diverse program areas of the Dyson School: management; international development/trade; environment/resource economics; and food/agricultural economics. Case material will be contributed by the companies from the DUAC. Key topics will include: Optimization (Solver), Data graphing, Financial modeling, Ethical/social dimensions of IT, Forecasting, Pivot tables, Exponential smoothing, and Simulation.

    Outcome 1: Provide students with the skills needed to employ spreadsheet modeling techniques for economic and management analysis.

  
  •  

    AEM 2050 - Introduction to Agricultural and Development Finance


    (SBA)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden Overlaps: students who have taken AEM 2240 /AEM 2241  are not allowed to enroll in AEM 2050.
    Recommended prerequisite: calculus and/or statistics; a course in Economics.

    J. Woodard.

    Introductory course which provides an overview of principles and practices of agricultural and development finance, from the perspectives of the business owner, lender, and policymaker. Topics include sources of capital, financing entry into agriculture, financial analysis businesses, capital management, financial statements, credit instruments, loan analysis, and financial risk. Applications in index insurance in developing countries, microfinance, guarantee funds, the Farm Credit System, crop insurance, and risk management.

    Outcome 1: Students will learn and be able to apply financial concepts to solve financial economic problems in agriculture and development including understanding mortgages, bonds, equity, and other fundamental concepts.

    Outcome 2: Students will gain an introductory knowledge and understanding to financing concepts including time value of money, financial and risk management instruments, among others.

  
  •  

    AEM 2100 - Introductory Statistics


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden Overlap: Students may receive credit for only one course in the following group: AEM 2100 ENGRD 2700 HADM 2010 ILRST 2100 /STSCI 2100 MATH 1710 PAM 2100 PAM 2101 PSYCH 3500 SOC 3010 STSCI 2150 .
    Prerequisite: college algebra.

    C. L. van Es.

    Introduces statistical methods. Topics include the descriptive analysis of data, probability concepts and distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation analysis. Includes an introduction to Minitab, a statistical software package.

  
  •  

    AEM 2190 - Introduction to Applied Portfolio Management


         
    Summer. 4 credits.

    Offered in New York City. Special program.

    H. Qian.

    Topics include capital markets, the impact of the economy and the Federal Reserve System, recent stock market history, regulation, investment banking, and management principles of both institutional and individual portfolios. Industry guest speakers provide unique perspectives.

  
  •  

    AEM 2200 - Business Management and Organization


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Enrollment limited to and required for: Dyson/AEM majors.

    P. D. Perez, A. Leiponen.

    Foundational course, meant to familiarize students with the use of core concepts in marketing, accounting, organizational design and management, entrepreneurship and strategy, teamwork, leadership, and ethics; as well as with the Dyson/AEM major and the business careers that may follow it. Significant writing and analytical components (both individual and team based case study analysis, evaluation of a U.S. publicly traded corporation).

    Outcome 1: Become conversant with foundational concepts of marketing, entrepreneurship, accounting, strategic management, organizational design and management, teamwork, leadership and business ethics.

    Outcome 2: Practice the ability to apply foundational concepts to analyze business situations, problems, and news.

    Outcome 3: Become familiarized with methodologies and tools (ie. Excel) that can be applied successfully in the analysis of business situations, problems, and news.

    Outcome 4: Practice the ability to apply foundational concepts through a comprehensive analysis of a US publicly traded corporation.

    Outcome 5: Gain exposure to a critical stance towards business and management, and with the ethical principles associated with business and management.

    Outcome 6: Become familiar with the concepts of professional career and organizational citizenship through formal exposure to the Dyson School and AEM, and mentorship in the development of a plan of studies and of a professional plan.

    Outcome 7: Practice both formal and informal teamwork.

  
  •  

    AEM 2210 - Financial Accounting


         
    Fall, spring, summer. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Forbidden Overlaps: AEM 2225 , HADM 1210 HADM 2230 .
    Enrollment limited to: non-AEM majors. Only AEM 2225 can count towards the Dyson major requirements. Students who will be applying for internal transfer should not take this course as a freshman.

    Z. Beg.

    Comprehensive introduction to financial accounting concepts and techniques, intended to provide a basic understanding of the accounting cycle, elements of financial statements, underlying theory of GAAP, and financial statement interpretation. Topics include methods of recording inventory, receivables, depreciation, bonds, and equity. Requires two evening prelims and a comprehensive final; weekly homework assignments.

  
  •  

    AEM 2225 - Financial Accounting For Dyson Majors


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden Overlap: AEM 2210 HADM 1210 , HADM 2230 .
    Enrollment limited to: Dyson majors only.

    J. E. Little.

    Comprehensive introduction to financial accounting concepts and techniques for the Dyson Major, intended to provide a basic understanding of the accounting cycle, elements of financial statements, underlying theory of GAAP, and financial statement interpretation. Topics include methods of recording inventory, receivables, depreciation, bonds, and equity. Includes a Computerized Accounting Module. Requires two evening prelims and a comprehensive final; weekly homework assignments.

    Outcome 1: Develop effective communication skills in finance.

    Outcome 2: Attain analytical and functional competency in basic business and economic skills.

    Outcome 3: Demonstrate working knowledge of ethics and ability to apply to real world setting.

    Outcome 4: Demonstrate ability to solve practical business problems and make an impact in real world and society.

    Outcome 5: Develop skills to be critical consumers of business information and research.

    Outcome 6: Develop the ability to work with computerized accounting systems.

  
  •  

    AEM 2230 - Cooperative Business Management


         
    Spring. 2 credits.

    T. M. Schmit.

    An evaluation of the fundamental principles, structure, finance, management and governance associated with the cooperative organization, with a focus on agricultural cooperatives. Analyses of the cooperative business organization within the modern economy are emphasized through a mix of lectures, guest speakers, and cooperative business case study discussions.

    Outcome 1: Identify economic justifications for the cooperative as a business entity.

    Outcome 2: Illustrate unique characteristics surrounding the governance, finance, and management of cooperative businesses.

    Outcome 3: Critique contemporary issues facing modern agribusinesses with emphasis on challenges facing cooperatives that compete with investor-owned firms.

  
  •  

    AEM 2240 - Finance for Dyson Majors


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Forbidden Overlap: Students may receive credit for only one course in the following group: AEM 2240, AEM 2241 , NCC 5560 , HADM 2220 , or HADM 2250 .
    Prerequisite: AEM 2100 , AEM 1200 , and AEM 2210 , or equivalents. Enrollment limited to: Dyson undergraduates only.

    B. Hwang.

    Focuses on the mathematics of finance, valuation, and the economics of managerial decisions, corporate financial policy, risk management, and investments. Topics include the time value of money, bond and stock valuation, capital-budgeting decisions, financing alternatives, the cost of capital and the capital-structure decision, distribution policy, mergers and acquisitions and restructuring, options, forward and futures contracts, market efficiency and market anomalies, strategies of successful investors, and personal finance.

    Outcome 1: Become familiar with the “Time Value of Money” and comfortable using that concept and formulas to solve problems in the areas of corporate finance, investments, and personal finance.

    Outcome 2: Become familiar with stock and bond markets and learn the economics and mathematics behind the valuation of bonds, stocks, and firms.

    Outcome 3: Become familiar with modern portfolio theory including the relationship between risk and return, the concept of diversification, the capital asset pricing model, and the arbitrage pricing theory.

    Outcome 4: Become familiar with corporate financial decisions such as whether to accept or reject a project (“Capital Budgeting”), how to finance operations (“Capital Structure”), if and how to make payouts to investors (“Distribution Policy”), and how to analyze potential acquisitions (“Mergers & Acquisitions”).

    Outcome 5: Become familiar with using derivatives as investment and risk management tools. Derivatives covered include options, convertibles, forward and futures contracts, and swaps.

    Outcome 6: Become familiar with the concept of market efficiency and the data in support of the theory. Also become aware of tests suggesting the existence of market anomalies which run counter to the notion of market efficiency.

    Outcome 7: Become aware of some basic investment concepts and strategies.

    Outcome 8: Become aware of some basic personal financial decisions including the use of tax-advantaged retirement accounts such 401(k)’s and IRA’s, asset allocation, saving for educational expenses, insurance decisions, and ways to pass assets on to one’s heirs.

    Outcome 9: Become aware of current financial and economic events.

  
  •  

    AEM 2241 - Finance


         
    Fall, spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Forbidden Overlap: Students may receive credit for only one course in the following group: AEM 2240 , AEM 2241 , NCC 5560 , HADM 2220 , or HADM 2250 .
    Prerequisite:  AEM 2100 ,   AEM 1200 , and AEM 2210 , or equivalents. Priority given to: Dyson Minors, University-wide Business Minors, and CALS students.

    R. T. Curtis.

    This course is a survey of topics in finance. It focuses on the mathematics of finance, valuation, the economics of managerial decisions, corporate financial policy, risk management, investments, and personal finance.

    Outcome 1: Become familiar with the “Time Value of Money” and comfortable using that concept and formulas to solve problems in the areas of corporate finance, investments, and personal finance.

    Outcome 2: Become familiar with stock and bond markets and learn the economics and mathematics behind the valuation of bonds, stocks, and firms.

    Outcome 3: Become familiar with modern portfolio theory including the relationship between risk and return, the concept of diversification, the capital asset pricing model, and the arbitrage pricing theory.

    Outcome 4: Become familiar with corporate financial decisions such as whether to accept or reject a project (“Capital Budgeting”), how to finance operations (“Capital Structure”), if and how to make payouts to investors (“Distribution Policy”), and how to analyze potential acquisitions (“Mergers & Acquisitions”).

    Outcome 5: Become familiar with using derivatives as investment and risk management tools. Derivatives covered include options, convertibles, forward and futures contracts, and swaps.

    Outcome 6: Become familiar with the concept of market efficiency and the data in support of the theory. Also become aware of tests suggesting the existence of market anomalies which run counter to the notion of market efficiency.

    Outcome 7: Become aware of some basic investment concepts and strategies.

    Outcome 8: Become aware of some basic personal financial decisions including the use of tax-advantaged retirement accounts such 401(k)’s and IRA’s, asset allocation, saving for educational expenses, insurance decisions, and ways to pass assets on to one’s heirs.

    Outcome 9: Become aware of current financial and economic events.

  
  •  

    AEM 2260 - Cornell/Dyson Certificate in Business Management Special Activities


         
    Summer. 1 credit.

    Staff.

    Students participate in special activities as part of the Cornell/Dyson Certificate in Business Management summer immersion program. While activities may vary from year to year, in the past these activities have included a field trip to corporate sites in New York City, Cornell Outdoor Education teambuilding and leadership exercises, a career services résumé/job search presentation, and a talk on the evolution of a local small business by its founder. Student participation in all activities is mandatory and a paper focusing on “takeaways” from each activity is required.

    Outcome 1: Develop business skills, and learn about high-performance team and leadership skills.

    Outcome 2: Interact with an entrepreneur, and have an opportunity for personal growth.

  
  •  

    AEM 2300 - International Trade and Finance

    (crosslisted) ECON 2300 
    (SBA)      
    Spring, summer. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: ECON 1110  or equivalent. Recommended prerequisite: ECON 1120  or equivalent.

    D. R. Lee.

    One-semester introduction to international economic principles and issues. Begins by surveying key topics such as the elements of comparative advantage, tariff and nontariff barriers, and multilateral institutions. The second part of the course treats selected topics in international finance, including exchange rates, balance of payments, and capital markets. Discusses current issues such as the effects of trade liberalization, trade and economic growth, and instability in international capital markets. Designed as a less technical introduction to concepts developed at a more advanced level in AEM 4300  and ECON 4510 -ECON 4520 .

  
  •  

    AEM 2350 - Introduction To The Economics Of Development


    (SBA)      
    Fall. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: ECON 1110 ECON 1120 .

    S. Kyle.

    This course is intended as an introduction to the economics of low income countries. It focuses on the policies and constraints to promoting growth and development.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to understand the nature of poverty and how it is measured.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to understand how economic growth is measured and how this correlates to alternative measures of development.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to understand the structural changes in the economy that occur as a country increases per capita income.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to understand the leading economic models explaining these changes.

    Outcome 5: Students will become familiar with competing views of how economic policy can best promote economic growth and development.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to understand how linkages to the international economy can promote or hinder the process of economic growth and development.

  
  •  

    AEM 2400 - Marketing


         
    Fall, summer. 3 credits.

    Forbidden Overlap: AEM 2420 .
    Enrollment limited to: non-AEM majors with sophomore standing or higher.

    D. J. Perosio.

    Provides a broad introduction to the fundamentals of marketing. Explores the components of an organization’s strategic marketing program, including how to price, promote, and distribute goods and services. Industry guest lectures and current marketing applications from various companies are presented and analyzed.

  
  •  

    AEM 2410 - Marketing Plan Development


         
    Spring. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2400 . Enrollment limited to: AEM majors. Requirement for AEM majors.

    D. J. Perosio.

    Offers student teams the opportunity for an intense, hands-on application of basic marketing concepts through research and development of a marketing plan. Guided by a series of assignments, teams develop key components that are integrated into a comprehensive written plan for a local business.

  
  •  

    AEM 2420 - Marketing for Dyson Majors


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Enrollment required of and limited to: Dyson Majors Only.

    D. Perosio, S. Nasser.

    Provides a broad introduction to the fundamentals of marketing. Explores the components of an organization’s strategic marketing program, including how to price, promote, and distribute goods and services. Industry guest lectures and current marketing applications from various companies are presented and analyzed. Students will complete a marketing plan.

  
  •  

    AEM 2480 - Food and Consumer Packaged Goods Industry Dynamics


         
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2400 /AEM 2420 , and AEM 2200 /AEM 1200 . Co-meets with AEM 6480 .

    R. Hawkes.

    Covers merchandising principles and practices as they apply to food industry situations. Examines the various elements of merchandising such as buying, pricing, advertising, promotion, display, store layout, profit planning and control, and merchandising strategy. Considers the consequences of food industry trends and initiatives for other industry members, public policy makers, and consumers.

    Outcome 1: Students will explore the dynamics of food distribution systems and the economic principles that underly food industry dynamics.

    Outcome 2: Student assignments and exams will require finding, evaluating, and ethically using information.

    Outcome 3: Student assignments will require integration of quantitative and qualitative information to propose solutions.

    Outcome 4: Student assignments will be graded for clarity and composition.

    Outcome 5: Students will complete both individual and team assignments.

  
  •  

    AEM 2500 - Environmental and Resource Economics


    (SBA) (CU-SBY)     
    Fall. 3 credits.

    Forbidden Overlap: AEM 1500 .
    Prerequisite: ECON 1110 . Enrollment preference given to: students in majors that specifically require AEM 2500.

    A. Ortiz-Bobea.

    Introduces fundamental economic principles and the “economic approach” to policy issues, and demonstrates how these concepts underpin contemporary environmental and natural resource issues and policy solutions. Subjects include valuation, benefit-cost analysis, policy design, property rights, and ecological economics. Uses these tools to explore major current policy issues such as economic incentives in environmental policy, air and water pollution, depletion of renewable and nonrenewable resources, and global warming. Two evening exams and three out of class labs.

  
  •  

    AEM 2600 - Managerial Economics I


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden Overlaps: students may not receive credit for both AEM 2600  and ECON 3030 .
    Prerequisite: ECON 1110 , MATH 1106  or MATH 1110 .

    G. Blalock.

    This course covers microeconomic principles that inform managerial decisions in firms and organizations. The course will touch on how these principles apply to the Dyson School research foci of management, agribusiness, environmental sustainability, and emerging markets.

  
  •  

    AEM 2601 - Managerial Economics II


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2600 .

    S. Poczter.

    This course analyzes the sources of firms’ competitive advantage and develops the knowledge and skills necessary to be an effective strategy analyst. The course is grounded in microeconomic concepts taught in AEM 2600  in terms of discipline, and draws from corporate finance, marketing, human resource management and organization science. This course uses both lecture, discussion and case studies to encourage students to develop skills in formulating strategy in a practical context.

  
  •  

    AEM 2700 - Management Communication


         
    Fall, spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden overlap: COMM 2010 .
    Enrollment limited to: AEM majors.

    B. Earle.

    Management Communication is intended to help you think strategically about communication and aid you in improving your writing, presentation, and interpersonal communication skills as a future manager. We will look at a set of “best practices” or guidelines that have been derived from both research and experience, give you the opportunity to put those guidelines into practice, and provide you with feedback on your work to help you strengthen your abilities. More often than not, we will be using a workshop format that will rely heavily on discussion and in-class exercises.

    Outcome 1: Formulate an effective communication strategy for any message, in any medium, and in any situation.

    Outcome 2: Write clearly, concisely, and convincingly.

    Outcome 3: Create effective presentations that are delivered with confidence and poise.

    Outcome 4: Give and receive feedback that will improve yours and others’ communication.

    Outcome 5: Listen for understanding.

    Outcome 6: Work effectively with others in small groups or teams.

    Outcome 7: Identify and negotiate the difference in communication between yourself and people who are not from your culture.

  
  •  

    AEM 2770 - Excursions in Computational Sustainability

    (crosslisted) CS 2770 , INFO 2770  
    (SBA) (CU-SBY)     
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: students are expected to have basic knowledge of probability theory and calculus.

    C. Gomes, B. Selman.

    Balancing environmental, economic, and societal needs for a sustainable future encompasses problems of unprecedented size and complexity. Computing and information science can play an important role in addressing critical sustainability challenges faced by present and future generations. The goal of the course is to introduce students to a range of sustainability challenges and to computational methods that can help address such challenges. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, biodiversity and wildlife conservation, poverty mitigation, food security, renewable resources, energy, transportation, and climate change. In the context of these sustainability topics, the course will introduce students to mathematical and computational modeling techniques, algorithms, and statistical methods. The course is at the introductory undergraduate level. Students are expected to have basic knowledge of probability theory and calculus.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to identify notions of sustainability as they arise in ecology, geology, economics, and other biological, physical, and social sciences.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to mathematically interpret and calculate levels of sustainability.

    Outcome 3: Students will learn how to problem solve techniques of sustainability via computational models, algorithms, and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    AEM 3020 - Farm Business Management


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Enrollment limited: freshmen excluded.

    W. A. Knoblauch.

    Intensive study of planning, directing, organizing, and controlling a farm business, with emphasis on the tools of managerial analysis and decision making. Topics include financial statements, business analysis, budgeting, and acquisition, organization, and management of capital, labor, land, buildings, and machinery.

  
  •  

    AEM 3030 - Explorations in Analytic Modeling


         
    Fall, spring. 1.5 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: AEM 2010 .

    D. Haeger.

    Explorations in Analytic Modeling will be developed as a deeper exploration and model based approach to quantitative decision making within a spreadsheet platform. Applied decision making using primarily Microsoft Excel as a business analytics tool will focus on using applied cases requiring various financial and other models. As the course explores models, emphasis will be placed on the exploration and application of the tool to enhance decision making and improve outcomes. This data-driven course will move the student into the most complex functionality available in the Excel platform. Key topics will include: data management, data visualization, financial modeling, forecasting, optimization, pivot tables, and simulation. The course will also employ macro recording with introductory visual basic for applications programming.

    Outcome 1: Apply spreadsheet modeling analysis and decision making to different industries in business.

    Outcome 2: Design spreadsheet models for a breadth of business situations and problems.

    Outcome 3: Evaluate and understand the concept of data integrity and ethics associated with proprietary data.

    Outcome 4: Manipulate large data-sets and explore data management and cleansing.

    Outcome 5: Apply logic when making business decisions to solve real world business problems.

    Outcome 6: Demonstrate effective and efficient data display with charts and tables through model design and experimentation.

    Outcome 7: Infer and predict outcomes using forecasting and trending with financial impact analysis.

    Outcome 8: Expand into more complex decision making using multivariable scenarios.

    Outcome 9: Create and record Macros and become familiar with VBA language syntax.

  
  •  

    AEM 3040 - Dairy Markets and Policy Seminar


         
    Spring. 2 credits. S-U grades only.

    Attendance is mandatory for a satisfactory grade.

    A. Novakovic.

    Dairy markets and policy will be discussed from the perspectives of applied economics, industrial organization, marketing, supply chain coordination, and public policy analysis. Lectures are twice weekly in a format intended to encourage class participation. This course may be offered simultaneously at other universities, where participation will be by video. As such, class assignments may involve student partners at other universities. Subject to instructor approval, an additional 1-credit can be earned for an optional assignment to develop a dairy business marketing plan. This would be done under AEM 4970 .

    Outcome 1: Learn where to access data and information about dairy markets and policy and how to interpret publicly available information.

    Outcome 2: Develop knowledge and understanding of federal dairy programs and key elements of the dairy supply chain.

    Outcome 3: Improve ability to analyze dairy market interventions and the possible roles of the public sector in regulating competition.

  
  •  

    AEM 3050 - Management of Banking Companies


         
    Fall. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ECON 1110  or ECON 1120 . Enrollment preference given to: AEM juniors and seniors.

    J. J. Byrnes.

    Survey of banking industry and its management challenges, with particular attention to the financial crisis and implications for the future. Includes history and regulation of banking, understanding bank financial statements, management and oversight of industry, importance of capital, and the unique role of banks in society. Emphasis on current events. Includes a book report and a team research presentation.

    Outcome 1: Develop a better understanding of the banking industry, its role in society and history, the importance to the world’s economies and its regulatory and management challenges.

    Outcome 2: Help students consider and develop their own management capabilities by better understanding the financial crisis and recent developments; and in particular the lessons about ethics and basic principles of management.

  
  •  

    AEM 3060 - Practitioner’s Overview of Securities Markets and Investment Banking


         
    Spring. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Enrollment limited to: AEM majors only. Freshman enrollment is not allowed.

    M. Troy.

    A broad overview of various aspects of the Fixed Income and Equities Markets and the role of Investment Banks. Topics, amongst others, will include: Securities Sales and Trading, Fiscal and Monetary Policy effects on Markets, Asset Management, Private Equity and Leveraged Buyouts, Mergers and Acquisitions, and Risk Management. Course will focus on real life practices and may include guest speakers, role playing and trading simulations.

    Outcome 1: Develop effective communication skills.

    Outcome 2: Attain analytical and functional competency in basic business skills.

    Outcome 3: Demonstrate the ability to solve practical business problems and make an impact in society.

    Outcome 4: Develop skills to be critical consumers of business information and research.

  
  •  

    AEM 3100 - Business Statistics


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2100  or equivalent.

    C. L. van Es.

    Focuses on techniques used to analyze data from marketing research, business, and economics. Topics include experimental design and ANOVA, contingency-table analysis, quality-control methods, time-series analysis, and forecasting. Also includes brief introductions to nonparametric methods and multivariate analysis. Involves a research project designed to give experience in collecting and interpreting data.

    Outcome 1: Critically analyze statistical models.

    Outcome 2: Be able to communicate (orally and written) complex analyses.

    Outcome 3: Distinguish appropriate approaches to answering research questions using quantitative methods.

  
  •  

    AEM 3120 - Branding and Brand Management


         
    Spring (seven-week session). 1 credit. S-U grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2420  or equivalents.

    P. Mandel.

    Branding has become one of the most important aspects of business strategy. Developing brand identity and strategy are critical steps in successful marketing of a product. Developing a brand strategy requires an understanding of: what is branding, how to develop brand equity, how to reach the target audience, the importance of consistent communications and brand planning. This course includes the concepts of brand, brand equity and strategic brand management. Topics covered include Brand Equity, Consumer Communications, Reaching Consumers and Brand Planning. Post this class participants will understand the importance of building brand equity and communicating throughout all consumer touch points. Class work includes a combination of case studies, lectures, and class discussions. Topics discussed will relate to real life business situations.

    Outcome 1: Participants will be able to evaluate branding strategies with enhancing strategic thinking skills.

  
  •  

    AEM 3200 - Business Law I

    (crosslisted) NBA 5600  
         
    Fall, summer. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Enrollment limited to: juniors, seniors, or graduate students.

    D. A. Grossman.

    Examines legal problems of particular interest to persons who expect to engage in business. Emphasizes the law of contracts, sales, agency, and property.

  
  •  

    AEM 3210 - Business Law II

    (crosslisted) NBA 5610  
         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: business law course or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to: juniors, seniors, or graduate students.

    D. A. Grossman.

    The first portion of this course examines legal issues in the formation and operation of business enterprises, particularly partnerships, corporations, and limited-liability companies. The second portion reviews selected topics in business law, like employment discrimination, debtor/creditor relations, product liability, unfair competition, e-commerce law, and international business law.

  
  •  

    AEM 3220 - Digital Business Strategy


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 1200  and ECON 1110 .

    A. Leiponen.

    Explores the impact of new technologies on business processes and industries. Focuses particularly on the effects of information and communication technologies (ICT). The objective is to understand the nature of information as an economic good, business opportunities and challenges created by ICT, and organizational constraints involved in exploiting these opportunities.

  
  •  

    AEM 3230 - Managerial Accounting


         
    Winter, spring, summer. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2210  or equivalent. Enrollment priority given to: CALS majors.

    L. Parrilli.

    Introduction to cost accounting emphasizing the application of accounting concepts to managerial control and decision making. Major topics include product costing, standard costing, cost behavior, cost allocation, budgeting, variance analysis, and accounting systems in the manufacturing environment. Requires use of electronic spreadsheets. Includes an evening prelim, a second exam, and weekly homework.

  
  •  

    AEM 3245 - Organizational Behavior


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden Overlap: ILROB 1220 ILROB 5200 .
    Prerequisite: AEM 1200  OR AEM 2200  OR equivalent.

    K. Kniffin.

    This course examines evidence-based principles of individual and group behavior in relation to leadership and management. Topics include the nature and design of groups, the factors that improve team performance, and the importance of skills including dispute resolution, persuasion, and negotiations, Assignments provide opportunities for the engagement and application of analytical skills relating to real-world organizations.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to juxtapose and consider organizational dynamics that involve individuals and groups across a wide array of model domains.

    Outcome 2: Students will closely and directly engage an array of research/analytic methodologies that have applicability across industries.

    Outcome 3: Students will leverage lessons that are available from their past organizational experiences for the purposes of leadership development as well as organizational analysis and management.

  
  •  

    AEM 3249 - Entrepreneurial Marketing and Strategy


         
    Fall. 3 credits.

    D. Streeter.

    The course is focused on the tools and frameworks that assist a startup entrepreneur in exploring the feasibility of a new idea. After establishing an understanding of the funding process for new ventures, students will learn about and practice market research techniques involving both formal (survey, focus group) and informal (expert interviews, social media) ways to understand the adoption behavior and urgent needs/wants of prospective customers. In addition, participants will learn how to take findings from market research to formulate business models and strategies. In the final seven weeks of the course, students will participate in teams using a computer platform that simulates running a startup in a team setting.

    Outcome 1: After establishing an understanding of the funding process for new ventures, students will learn about and practice market research techniques involving both formal (survey, focus group) and informal (expert interviews, social media) ways to understand the adoption behavior and urgent needs/wants of prospective customers.

    Outcome 2: Learn how to take findings from market research to formulate business models and strategies.

    Outcome 3: Participate in teams using a computer platform that simulates running a startup in a team setting.

  
  •  

    AEM 3250 - Business Planning Process for New Ventures


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 3249 , AEM 2210 AEM 1200  or the equivalent. Enrollment limited to: juniors or seniors.

    D. H. Streeter.

    This course exposes students to the business planning process for new ventures, which involves intense teamwork and an in-depth analysis of the business opportunity. Although the course is focused on methods, frameworks and learning outcomes that are valuable for students who want to start or work in an entrepreneurial business, it is equally useful to those who want careers in a corporate, non-profit or governmental setting. Students work in teams to choose an innovative idea to explore in a semester-long project. Work includes performing industry, competitor and customer research, defining a value proposition, creating business and marketing strategies, outlining key operational realities and building a set of financials. The final project is a written business plan and accompanying oral presentation or “pitch.”

  
  •  

    AEM 3270 - Marketing-Operations Simulation


         
    Fall. 2 credits. S-U grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2210  or permission of instructor. Preferred prerequisites: AEM 2400  or AEM 2420  and AEM 2480 .

    W. Drake.

    Teams of students operate retail food companies and compete in a computerized simulation of a dynamic and competitive market. Teams develop strategy and make decisions regarding promotional tactics, pricing, labor, procurement, inventory, capital expenditures, dept structure and financing. Results are tracked through the use of financial statements - balance sheets, profit and loss, and cash flow. The team that creates the most equity is declared the winner of the simulation.

    Outcome 1: Demonstration of the link between operating decisions and outcomes via the use of financial statements.

    Outcome 2: Learn the importance of cash flow and cash flow management to the health of the business.

    Outcome 3: Learn the importance of forecasting and it’s effect on various aspects of the business.

    Outcome 4: Provide an appreciation for the complexities of managing a multiple unit food retailer.

    Outcome 5: Learn the necessity of organization and effective decision making to the successful operation of a business.

  
  •  

    AEM 3290 - International Agribusiness Study Trip

    (crosslisted) FDSC 3290  
    (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. Offered alternate years. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: previous business management or applied economics courses necessary.

    T. M. Schmit, A. Orta-Ramirez, E. Tako.

    Gives students interested in agribusiness management exposure to the managerial practices essential to the success of agriculture, agribusiness, and food companies competing in the global marketplace. The course involves an intense one-week international field study trip that takes place during Spring break of the Spring semester the course is offered. The study trip involves a combination of educational instruction at a host university, along with organized field study trips to agricultural and food system related operations, both public and private in organization, in the selected country. The course meets for a few sessions in advance of the field study trip. A paper analyzing an aspect of the field study is required.

    Outcome 1: Describe successful managerial practices in global agriculture, agribusiness, and food industry companies.

    Outcome 2: Explain important factors involved in agricultural industry development, including comparative advantages in production, human, and technological resources, agricultural and trade policies, integrated agricultural systems, and global competitiveness.

    Outcome 3: Analyze and communicate economic concepts of agricultural activities as they relate to domestic and international influences.

  
  •  

    AEM 3310 - Introduction to Business Regulation


         
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: Intermediate Micro at the level of ECON 3030 , PAM 2000 , or AEM 2600 /AEM 2601 AEM 1200  or AEM 2200 ; AEM 3200  recommended but not required.

    W. H. Lesser.

    Business everywhere functions under regulation. Being able to operate effectively in a regulated environment is critical for business, especially so in heavily regulated sectors like pharmaceuticals, electricity generation, and finance. This class uses a case-based approach to understanding and functioning under regulations, with particular attention to consumer products, environment, communication, and finance. As a group project, students are asked to develop and present a case of their own on a business regulatory issue. Students also need to appreciate why societies regulate. In addition to the economic/efficiency explanations, the class reads excerpts from The Jungle, Silent Spring and other works and events like the Titanic sinking (which initiated radio regulation) and the Great Depression and Great Recession (which led to finance regulations).

    Outcome 1: Attain analytical and functional competency in basic business and economic skills.

    Outcome 2: Demonstrate the ability to solve practical business and economic problems and make an impact in society.

  
  •  

    AEM 3320 - Leadership and Management in Sports


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with AEM 6325 .

    K. Kniffin.

    This course draws upon the study of sports for the purpose of understanding and studying evidence-based principles of individual and organizational behavior. Topics include the nature of motivation, momentum, and coaching as well as the challenges of talent identification, team-level coordination, and strategy development. Assignments provide opportunities for the development and application of analytic skills relating to leadership and management.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to consider and juxtapose organizational dynamics that involve individuals and teams across and beyond the domain of sports.

    Outcome 2: Students will closely and directly engage an array of research/analytic methodologies that applicability inside and outside of sports-focused organizations.

    Outcome 3: Students will leverage lessons that are available from the study of sports for the purposes of leadership development as well as organizational analysis and management.

  
  •  

    AEM 3340 - Women, Leadership, and Entrepreneurship


         
    Fall (weeks 1-7). 1 credit.

    Enrollment limited to: juniors or seniors.

    D. H. Streeter.

    Seminar that uses lectures, guest panels, and readings to focus on issues facing women (and their partners) in their business careers. Topics include status of women in business leadership, pathways and strategies for leadership development, family/life balance issues, gender issues in the workplace, and resources for emerging leaders.

  
  •  

    AEM 3350 - International Technology Marketing of Biotechnology


         
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: ECON 1110  and one college biology course or equivalents.

    W. H. Lesser.

    Explores international technology marketing from an economics perspective using biotechnology as an example. Topics include technology theories, products, risk (health and environmental) regulation, industry structure, labeling uses and regulations, public perceptions, patents, trade, and international conventions. The course is of interest to students of biotechnology, public technology policy, and international technology marketing.

  
  •  

    AEM 3360 - Intermediate Accounting I


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2210  and AEM 3230 . Priority given to: students specializing in accounting.

    E. Yeung.

    Includes an overview of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, balance sheet valuation, and income measurement and recognition. Other topics include accounting for pensions, earnings per share, and special financial reporting issues.

  
  •  

    AEM 3370 - Intermediate Accounting II


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: AEM 3360  Intermediate Accounting I.

    M. Nelson.

    Continuation of the in-depth study of accounting theory, generally accepted accounting principles, and the techniques involved in measuring, recording, summarizing, and reporting financial data for business organizations. Learn the GAAP accounting for revenue, investments, pensions, taxes, accounting changes, and statement of cash flows. Understand accounting alternatives within GAAP and accounting alternatives to GAAP for the topics covered so that students are prepared to understand and use future changes in GAAP. Course objectives will be achieved by a combination of lectures and analyzing and discussing articles from the financial press and cases that are based on actual financial statements.

  
  •  

    AEM 3380 - Social Entrepreneurs, Innovators, and Problem Solvers


    (SBA)      
    Fall, summer. 4 credits (fall); 3 credits (summer).

    A. Wessels.

    Introduces students to the social entrepreneurs, innovators, and visionaries who are creating new strategies for solving society’s problems. The course highlights innovative case studies of success in restoring the environment, resolving conflicts, curing diseases, overcoming poverty, and addressing other problems of social injustice. At the end of the course, each student develops an original blueprint for social innovation: a creative proposal for solving a societal problem.

  
  •  

    AEM 3381 - Social Entrepreneurship Field Study


    (CU-CEL, CU-ITL)     
    Fall, spring (multi-semester). 1 credit. Multi-semester course.

    Permission of instructor required.

    D. Streeter.

    The course includes on-campus sessions in the Fall semester that prepare students for an 8-day field trip to work with small business owners in El Rodeito, Honduras. Students will be required to sign up for AEM 3382 in the following Spring semester in order to receive a grade for both AEM 3381 and 3382. In the Fall semester, students will learn about the principles of social entrepreneurship through the use of case studies, class discussion, and guest speakers. In addition, students will learn about specific social, cultural and economic issues of the region. The field trip takes place over the winter term and the projects are designed to strengthen small businesses in the region. Participants will work with a non-profit, Mayor Potencial, whose mission is to improve educational standards and facilities in Latin America, empowering young leaders to transform their home communities. The course is ideal for students interested in hands-on experiences as consultants to entrepreneurial social ventures. Participants are expected to cover part of the costs of the trip. Scholarships are available on a limited basis. Students will receive a placeholder grade (R) in the fall and upon completion of AEM 3382, the R grade will be replaced with an S/U grade.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to analyze social ventures using entrepreneurial frameworks in a developing world context.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to make practical, actionable recommendations to help small businesses, with awareness of local contexts.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to interact with people of other cultures and ethnicities, with a higher level of self-awareness and empathy.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to articulate the root causes of poverty and the impact of globalization on social ventures.

  
  •  

    AEM 3382 - Social Enterprise Development


         
    Fall, spring (multi-semester). 1 credit. S-U grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 3381 . Permission of instructor required.

    D. Streeter.

    This course is about using entrepreneurial competencies to craft innovative responses to social problems. Entrepreneurs are particularly good at recognizing opportunities, exploring innovative approaches, mobilizing resource, managing risk and building viable enterprises. These skills are just as viable in the social sector as they are in business. This course is the second in a year long class series that is designed to provide an experiential learning opportunity in the field of social entrepreneurship. During the Fall AEM 3381 prepares students for an 8 day field trip to work with small business owners in El Rodeito, Honduras. During the Spring in AEM 3382 students develop a business plan for a social enterprise in Honduras. Students will analyze and reflect on their experience in Honduras and discuss the challenges faced. Students will submit social business plans; which are designed to strengthen small businesses in the region. The social business plans will facilitate the sharing of knowledge, the process of launching a viable and scalable social enterprise and the challenges they faced and how to overcome them. Participants will work with a non -profit, Mayor Potencial, whose mission is to improve educational standards and facilities in Latin America, empowering young leaders to transform their home communities. The course is ideal for students interested in hands on experiences as consultants to entrepreneurial social ventures.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to analyze social ventures using entrepreneurial frameworks in a developing world context.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to make practical, actionable recommendations to help small businesses, with awareness of local contexts.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to interact with people of other cultures and ethnicities, with a higher level of self-awareness and empathy.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to articulate the root causes of poverty and the impact of globalization on social ventures.

  
  •  

    AEM 3390 - Research Methods in International Development


         
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2100  and ECON 1110  or equivalents. Co-meets with AEM 6390 .

    A. K. Basu.

    This is a research methods course that uses basic statistics and quantitative techniques to analyze selected topics in international development. The aim of this course is to expose students to the various methodologies used by researchers in the field of international development: (i) core concepts such as poverty and inequality measurement (use of basic statistics); distributive justice (use of basic game theory) and governance issues in developing economies (use of basic public economics/welfare theorems/voting theories) and (ii) study of specific topics that are at the frontier of international development research where students will be required to gather data, design surveys and use basic econometrics tools in their assignments.

    Outcome 1: Attain analytical competency in applied economics.

    Outcome 2: Demonstrate quantitative skills in basic math and statistics.

    Outcome 3: Demonstrate ability to solve problems in development economics.

    Outcome 4: Develop effective communication skills in applied economics.

    Outcome 5: Demonstrate strategic thinking skills in applied economics.

  
  •  

    AEM 3430 - Principles of Supply Chain Management


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 1200 /AEM 2200 AEM 2100  or equivalent Intro Stats course, AEM 2210 /AEM 2225 , and ECON 1110  

    C. Nicholson.

    Supply chains are essential to how most businesses provide products and services to their customers, and supply chain management (SCM) involves decisions about assets, products, information and funds. This course provides an overview of key supply chain management concepts using the Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) framework that includes planning, supplier evaluation and selection, production and service provision processes, delivery and returns. The focus is on concepts and tools to improve supply chain decision making. Students will integrate knowledge from these different areas of SCM and other functional areas of business in a case analysis project.

    Outcome 1: Understanding of basic components and objectives of supply chains for products and services.

    Outcome 2: Understanding of how supply chain management (SCM) is linked to other business sub-disciplines (e.g., marketing, finance, accounting).

    Outcome 3: Understand components of supplier selection and evaluation.

    Outcome 4: Understand components of SCM planning and information organization.

    Outcome 5: Understanding of basic concepts of SCM production management and capacity planning (e.g., Sales & Operations Planning).

    Outcome 6: Understanding of basic concepts of demand forecasting relevant to supply chain decisions.

    Outcome 7: Understand principles of inventory management under uncertainty.

    Outcome 8: Knowledge acquisition of the role of transportation and distribution networks in SCM and the implications of decisions related to them.

    Outcome 9: Introductory-level knowledge of lean manufacturing, quality management and sustainability issues in supply chains.

  
  •  

    AEM 3440 - [Consumer Behavior]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2016-2017. 3 credits.

    Enrollment priority given to: AEM majors. Co-meets with AEM 6440 .

    B. Wansink.

    Develops a useful, conceptual understanding of the problem and strategies associated with the psychology behind consumer behavior. In doing so, the course provides frameworks that enable students to address these issues responsibly, systematically, and creatively.

  
  •  

    AEM 3450 - Sustainability Marketing


    (CU-SBY)     
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2420  or AEM 2400  and AEM 2410  or permission of instructor. Co-meets with AEM 6450 .

    M. Constas.

    This course focuses on how the demand for environmentally responsible business practice can be leveraged to construct an effective marketing strategy. Students who enroll in the class will: 1. Develop the capacity to view a range of emerging environmental issues and regulatory pressures as presenting a set of strategic opportunities across various business sectors, 2. Recognize the way in which environmental impact marketing employs strategies that are related to but also distinct from conventional marketing, 3. Apply knowledge from environmental impact marketing to identify strategies and tactics used by corporations that have successfully integrated sustainability and profitability. Marketing principles discussed in the course will also be related to selected topics of interest including corporate social responsibility, social entrepreneurship, and environmental performance metrics.

    Outcome 1: Students will develop the capacity to view a range of emerging environmental pressures as presenting a set of strategic opportunities for different business sectors.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to recognize the way in which environmental impact marketing employs strategies that are related to but also distinct from conventional marketing.

    Outcome 3: Students will know how to use knowledge of environmental impact marketing to evaluate marketing strategy.

  
  •  

    AEM 3520 - Financial Statements Analysis


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Forbidden Overlap: NBA 5060 .
    Prerequisite: AEM 2010 , AEM 2225 , AEM 2240 .

    J. McKinley.

    The course will focus on developing a framework for analyzing financial statements to make business decisions. The framework is intended to enhance the ability to qualitatively and quantitatively assess financial information. Goals of the course include learning to read financial statements for relevant information, understanding the impact of a business’ accounting choices and estimates, analyzing financial ratios and cash flow measures and methods for valuation of a business. Cases are incorporated in class discussions and assignments in order to illustrate concepts and allow students to put into practice the tools presented.

    Outcome 1: Develop effective communication skills in finance.

    Outcome 2: Attain analytical and functional competency in basic business and economic skills.

    Outcome 3: Demonstrate working knowledge of ethics and ability to apply to real world settings.

    Outcome 4: Demonstrate ability to solve practical business problems and make an impact in real world and society.

    Outcome 5: Develop skills to be critical consumers of business information and research.

  
  •  

    AEM 4020 - Food and Brand Lab Workshop I


         
    Fall. 3 credits.

    Permission of instructor required.

    B. Wansink.

    The purpose of the Food and Brand Lab Workshop is to provide students with an opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of consumers by involving them in collaborative, theory-based research related to food. This course is focused on asking and answering the “why” questions behind consumer behavior.

  
  •  

    AEM 4021 - Food and Brand Lab Workshop II


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Permission of instructor required.

    B. Wansink.

    The purpose of the Food and Brand Lab Workshop is to provide students with an opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of consumers by involving them in collaborative, theory-based research related to food. This course is focused on asking and answering the “why” questions behind consumer behavior.

  
  •  

    AEM 4030 - [Farm Management Study Trip]


         
    Spring. Next offered 2015-2016. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 3020 . Open by application only.

    W. A. Knoblauch.

    Special program to study production and management systems in diverse agricultural regions of the United States. Includes a trip (usually taken during spring break) to the region being studied. A different region is visited each year. The course meets in advance of the study trip and upon return from the trip. Students must write a paper that further explores an aspect of the trip.

  
  •  

    AEM 4040 - Credit and Banking in Agriculture


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: AEM 2050 /AEM 4050  or AEM 2240  or equivalent. Enrollment limited to: Farm Credit Fellows Program.

    J. Woodard.

    This course is restricted to Farm Credit Fellows and is dedicated to the practical application of financial management for agriculture and agribusiness. Topics include fundamentals of credit and lending risk in agriculture, and associated modeling, as well as firm modeling. Students will interact with agricultural lenders and the Farm Credit System through a one-week internship, a field trip to Enfield, CT, and will be required to complete an on-farm case study during the semester of their enrollment in the course. Students also do an internship the previous summer, and an in-depth on-site case study during the course.

    Outcome 1: Students will gain an understanding of the operations and structure of the farm credit system via lectures, case studies, internship, and field study.

  
  •  

    AEM 4050 - Agricultural Finance


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 3020  or equivalent. AEM 2010  or ILRHR 2660  or HADM 2740  (the computing course can be taken concurrently with AEM 4050 ). Recommended prerequisite: calculus and statistics.

    J. Woodard.

    Discusses the principles and practices used in financing agricultural businesses, from the perspectives of the business owner and the lender. Topics include sources of capital, financing entry into agriculture, financial analysis of a business, capital management, financial statements, credit instruments, loan analysis, financial risk, and leasing.

    Outcome 1: Provide students a general overview of the fundamentals of finance and its application in agriculture and agribusiness.

  
  •  

    AEM 4060 - Risk Simulation and Monte Carlo Methods


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: Working knowledge of Excel. At least one course equivalent to AEM 2240  and at least one course in statistics or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to: undergraduate students. Co-meets with AEM 6061 .

    C. G. Turvey.

    This is a computer-based course that deals with the concepts of randomness and risk in financial management, capital budgeting, stock valuations, derivatives, and investment portfolios. The focus of the course is on applying realistic probability using Monte Carlo simulation to solve a variety of problems in finance.

  
  •  

    AEM 4070 - Advanced Financial Analytics with Applications in Agriculture and Development


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: AEM 2010 , AEM 2240 , and a course in statistics/econometrics. Basic programming knowledge anad statistical knowledge, or a course in programming (Python, C++, MATLAB, etc.) highly recommended and assumed. Co-meets with AEM 6070 . Appropriate for well qualified Dyson undergraduates, students in a technical field such as Engineering/CS who have an interest in finance.

    J. Woodard.

    Advanced course in applying skills learned in finance and statistics to development of analytical tools and financial products, including topics in computational finance, financial engineering for agriculture and development, working with and analyzing big data and large scale empirical applications, risk management systems, interacting with and using database servers using SQL, and associated strategic and operational considerations. Focus will be on exposing students to the technical and analytic pipeline involved in bringing new financial products to market, including problem identification, concept development, research and development, prototyping, and technical deployment. An independent guided group project will be required. Course will primarily utilize MATLAB, Microsoft SQL Server, and Excel/VBA. AEM 6070 grad students will be required to write a paper in the style of a peer reviewed journal based on the research and model developed, couched within a relevant research question.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to apply fundamentals of finance, statistics, and agriculture to develop and deploy financial products and analytical tools in an industrial setting, including model building/implementation and database use and integration.

  
  •  

    AEM 4080 - Innovation And New Product Management


         
    Spring. 1.5 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2420 .

    S. Nasser.

    In a rapidly changing business environment where product life cycles are shortening and competition is intensifying, creating new products has become the most significant and most risky activity within a firm. This course aims to develop an understanding of the “state of the art” strategies, processes and methods used in developing new products. This course focuses on key new product issues including generation and assessment of ideas, value creation in competitive markets, the impact of disruptive technologies on mainstream industries, and the diffusion of innovative new products and services. This is a case based course, where students participate in a dynamic and interactive group environment to develop the capacity to use the information learned to make informed new product decisions.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to integrate the customer and knowledge of the customer into this process.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to apply concepts and tools appropriate for new product development analysis.

    Outcome 3: Students will develop effective recommendations and action plans for companies facing difficult decisions about bringing new products to market.

  
  •  

    AEM 4110 - Introduction to Econometrics


         
    Fall. 3 credits. No audit.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2100  and either ECON 3030 AEM 2600  or equivalents.

    L. W. Tauer.

    This course is an introduction to basic econometric principles and the use of statistical techniques to estimate empirical economic models. Multiple regression is introduced and procedures to accommodate data issues and limitations are presented. Topics discussed include simultaneous equations, panel models and limited dependent variable models. Time series approaches are introduced. Students are required to estimate econometric models using provided data sets.

  
  •  

    AEM 4120 - Computational Methods for Management and Economics


         
    Fall. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2100  or equivalent. Enrollment preference given to: juniors, seniors, and M.S. degree candidates.

    C. Gomes.

    Course in applied mathematical programming. Emphasizes formulation of and interpretation of solutions to mathematical models of problems in economics and business. Studies blending, resource allocation, capital budgeting, transportation and financial planning, and inventory management. Introduces integer and nonlinear programming.

  
  •  

    AEM 4140 - Behavioral Economics and Managerial Decisions


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ECON 3030  or PAM 2000 . Course fee: lab fee $40. Enrollment limited to: juniors or seniors.

    D. R. Just, W. P. Schulze.

    Behavioral economics integrates psychology and economics by identifying systematic anomalies in decision making. These are now recognized to be an important source of error in business decisions, and they provide the foundation for both behavioral marketing and finance. The course compares rational choice theory with behavior both in lecture and through a series of economics experiments in which students face situations that are likely to lead to anomalies such as “the winner’s curse,” the status quo bias, hyperbolic discounting, and bias in assessing risks. Students have the opportunity to evaluate their own decision making.

  
  •  

    AEM 4150 - Price Analysis


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2100  or equivalent; and ECON 3030 , PAM 2000 AEM 2600 /AEM 2601  or equivalent.

    H. M. Kaiser.

    Focuses on the analysis of supply and demand characteristics of commodities with particular attention to agricultural products. Pays special attention to empirical analysis. Includes institutional aspects of pricing, temporal and spatial price relationships, price forecasting, and the economic consequences of pricing decisions.

  
  •  

    AEM 4160 - Strategic Pricing


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: Introductory Statistics, Calculus I, as well as either AEM 2600 ECON 3030 , or PAM 2000 .

    J. Liaukonyte.

    This quantitative course explores various pricing strategies by taking into consideration the role of consumer behavior, economics, statistics, and management science. Topics include product tying and bundling, peak load pricing, price matching, warranty pricing, advanced booking, and the 99-cent pricing perceptions.

  
  •  

    AEM 4170 - [Decision Models for Small and Large Businesses]


         
    Spring. Next offered 2015-2016. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2100  or equivalent. Enrollment limited to: juniors or seniors (priority given to AEM majors). No F lec in weeks labs are held.

    C. L. van Es.

    Focuses on economic and statistical models of decision analysis and their applications in large and small business settings. Demonstrates how use of models can improve the decision-making process by helping the decision maker. Emphasizes the importance of sensitivity analysis and the need to combine both quantitative and qualitative considerations in decision making. Draws cases from small business scenarios, the public policy arena, and corporate settings. Lab sessions focus on implementing decision models with computers.

  
  •  

    AEM 4190 - Strategic Thinking


         
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics course such as AEM 2600 , PAM 2000 ECON 3010 ECON 3030 , or equivalents.

    N. H. Chau.

    The art of thinking strategically puts outdoing one’s adversary at the core of the decision-making process, while anticipating that the adversary is doing exactly the same thing. Businesses make investment decisions and innovate products in anticipation of the reaction of their rivals; managers make pay contingent on peer performance, taking into account the reaction of their subordinates and superiors; national trade policies are formulated based on whether trading partners are committed to make credible concessions. This course introduces and explores the use of game theory to understand these interactions; students are expected to work with a balanced dose of both theory and relevant case studies. The objective of the course is to facilitate students’ ability to think strategically on firm level issues (e.g., pricing, advertising wars, product differentiation, and entry deterrence) and strategic policy interaction in international economic relations (e.g., trade wars and the arms race).

  
  •  

    AEM 4210 - Futures, Options and Financial Derivatives


         
    Spring. 3 credits.

    Prerequisite: AEM 2100  and AEM 2240  or equivalents. Recommended prerequisite: ECON 3030  or AEM 2600 /AEM 2601  or equivalent and a calculus course; familiarity with calculus and probability and statistics. Enrollment limited to: priority given to AEM students. Co-meets with AEM 6410 .

    C. G. Turvey.

    Covers the pricing of derivatives and how derivatives can be used for the purpose of risk management and speculation. A portion of this course involves the use of spreadsheet or other computer programs.

  
  •  

    AEM 4230 - Contemporary Topics in Behavioral Finance


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: ECON 1110 , MATH 1110  or equivalent, AEM 2100  or equivalent, AEM 2240 .

    V. L. Bogan.

    This course is designed to stimulate critical thinking about contemporary topics that attract regular attention in the press among key finance decision-makers. The course draws on the theory of modern finance to facilitate the understanding of real world issues. The course will cover topics in traditional and behavioral finance; focusing on corporate governance, financial markets, portfolio formation, market efficiency, and fixed income securities.

    Outcome 1: Develop effective communication skills.

    Outcome 2: Attain analytic and functional competency in the basic business and economic skills.

    Outcome 3: Demonstrate working knowledge of ethics and ability to apply real world settings.

    Outcome 4: Develop skills to be critical consumers of business and economic information and research.

  
  •  

    AEM 4260 - Fixed-Income Securities


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: MATH 1110  or equivalent, AEM 2100  or equivalent, AEM 2240 .

    V. L. Bogan.

    Focuses on fixed-income securities including corporate bonds, default-free bonds, and floating rate notes. Other topics include related financial instruments such as forwards and futures on fixed-income securities, interest rate swaps, bond options, and mortgage-backed securities. In addition to the analysis of specific types of fixed-income securities, there is an examination of the tools used in bond portfolio management.

    Outcome 1: Develop effective communication skills.

    Outcome 2: Attain analytical and functional competency in the basic business and economic skills.

    Outcome 3: Demonstrate the ability to solve practical business and economic problems and make an impact in real world and society.

  
  •  

    AEM 4280 - Valuation of Capital Investment


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: AEM 1200  and AEM 2240  or equivalents.

    D. T. Ng.

    Focuses on the analysis of financial information-particularly firms’ financial reports-for making decisions to invest in businesses. The primary focus is on equity (share) valuation, with some attention given to credit analysis. Examines various valuation models in detail and applies them in cases and projects involving listed companies. Topics include models of shareholder value, discounted cash flow approaches to valuation, the analysis of profitability, growth, and valuation generation in a firm, forecasting earnings and cash flows, proforma analysis for strategy and planning, analysis of risk, and the determination of price/earnings and market-to-book ratios.

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 107


Contract All Courses |