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Cornell University    
 
    
 
  Sep 24, 2017
 
Courses of Study 2017-2018

College Distribution Requirements


College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Learn more about Agriculture and Life Sciences Social Sciences and Humanities  Requirements.

D-AG Human Diversity - These courses explore the challenges of building a diverse society, and/or examine the various processes that marginalize people and produce unequal power relations.
CA-AG Cultural Analysis - Courses in this area study human life in particular cultural contexts through interpretive analysis of individual behavior, discourse, and social practice.
HA-AG Historical Analysis - Courses in this group interpret continuities and changes—political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, artistic, scientific—through time.
KCM-AG Knowledge Cognition and Moral Reasoning - Offerings in this area investigate the bases of human knowledge in its broadest sense, ranging from cognitive faculties shared by humans and animals such as perception, to abstract reasoning, to the ability to form and justify moral judgments.
LA-AG Literature and the Arts - Offerings in this area explore literature and the arts in two different but related ways. Some courses focus on the critical study of artworks and on their history, aesthetics, and theory. Others are devoted to the production and performance of artworks.
SBA-AG Social and Behavioral Analysis - Courses in this area examine human life in its social context through the use of social scientific methods, often including hypothesis testing, scientific sampling techniques, and statistical analysis.
BIO-AG Introductory Life Sciences/Biology Requirement for Biology majors – Offerings in the area provide a foundation for Biology majors in the field.
BIOLS-AG Introductory Life Sciences/Biology Requirement for Life Sciences majors – Offerings in the area provide a foundation for Life Sciences majors in the biological sciences.
BIONLS-AG Introductory Life Sciences/Biology Requirement for Non-Life Sciences majors - Offerings in the area provide a foundation for non-Life Sciences majors in the biological sciences.
OPHLS-AG Other Physical and Life Sciences Requirement – Offerings in this area explore additional physical and life science subjects as well as quantitative literacy (math) courses. 

College of Architecture, Art, and Planning

Learn more about Architecture, Art, and Planning Approved MQR, PBS, and Humanities and Social Sciences Courses .

PBS-AAP Physical and Biological Sciences - Courses in this area study the physical and/or biological sciences. AAP will recognize the PBS and related science classifications by any college at Cornell as long as the class is taken for three or more credits and a letter grade.
MQR-AAP Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning - Courses in this area study mathematics and quantitative reasoning. AAP will recognize the MQR classification by any college at Cornell as long as the class is taken for three or more credits and a letter grade.
CA-AAP Cultural Analysis - Courses in this area study human life in particular cultural contexts through interpretive analysis of individual behavior, discourse, and social practice. Topics include belief systems (science, medicine, religion), expressive arts and symbolic behavior (visual arts, performance, poetry, myth, narrative, ritual), identity (nationality, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality), social groups and institutions (family, market, community), power and politics (states, colonialism, inequality).  AAP will recognize the CA classification by any college at Cornell as long as the class is taken for three or more credits and a letter grade.
FL-AAP Foreign Language - Courses in this area are offered by the following departments: Africana Studies and Research Center (AS&RC – language only), Asian Studies (BENGL, BURM, CHIN, HINDI, INDO, JAPAN, KHMER, KOREA, SANSK, TAG, THAI, and VIET), Classics (CLASS – language only), German Studies (GERST – language only, DUTCH, and SWED), Linguistics (LING – languages only), Near Eastern Studies (NES - languages only), Romance Studies (CATAL, FRROM, ITALA, PORT, QUECH, and SPANR), and Russian Studies(RUSSA, HUNGR, POLSH, SEBCR, and UKRAN). AAP will recognize the FL classification by any college at Cornell as long as the class is taken for three or more credits and a letter grade.
HA-AAP Historical Analysis -Courses in this group interpret continuities and changes—political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, artistic, scientific—through time. The focus may be on groups of people, dominant or subordinate, a specific country or region, an event, a process, or a time period. AAP will recognize the HA classification by any college at Cornell as long as the class is taken for three or more credits and a letter grade.
KCM-AAP Knowledge Cognition and Moral Reasoning - Offerings in this area investigate the bases of human knowledge in its broadest sense, ranging from cognitive faculties shared by humans and animals such as perception, to abstract reasoning, to the ability to form and justify moral judgments. Courses investigating the sources, structure, and limits of cognition may use the methodologies of science, cognitive psychology, linguistics, or philosophy. Courses focusing on moral reasoning explore ways of reflecting on ethical questions that concern the nature of justice, the good life, or human values in general. AAP will recognize the KCM classification by any college at Cornell as long as the class is taken for three or more credits and a letter grade.
LA-AAP Literature and the Arts - Offerings in this area explore literature and the arts in two different but related ways. Some courses focus on the critical study of artworks and on their history, aesthetics, and theory. These courses develop skills of reading, observing, and hearing and encourage reflection on such experiences; many investigate the interplay among individual achievement, artistic tradition, and historical context. Other courses are devoted to the production and performance of artworks (in creative writing, performing arts, and media such as film and video). These courses emphasize the interaction among technical mastery, cognitive knowledge, and creative imagination. AAP will recognize the LA classification by any college at Cornell as long as the class is taken for three or more credits and a letter grade.
SBA-AAP Social and Behavioral Analysis - Courses in this area examine human life in its social context through the use of social scientific methods, often including hypothesis testing, scientific sampling techniques, and statistical analysis. Topics studied range from the thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and attitudes of individuals to interpersonal relations between individuals (e.g., in friendship, love, conflict) to larger social organizations (e.g., the family, society, religious or educational or civic institutions, the economy, government) to the relationships and conflicts among groups or individuals (e.g., discrimination, inequality, prejudice, stigmas, conflict resolution). Please note that DEA 1500  can be applied toward the SBA requirement. AAP will recognize the SBA classification by any college at Cornell as long as the class is taken for three or more credits and a letter grade.

College of Arts and Sciences

Learn more about Arts and Sciences Distribution Requirements .

PBS-AS

PBSS-AS

Physical and Biological Sciences - Courses satisfying this requirement provide an appreciation of how science generates and categorizes knowledge about nature, explore the relevance of science to society, develop proficiency in techniques of the natural sciences, and assess the limitations and strengths of science as a mode of inquiry.  These courses expose students to both the process and substance of science and introduce them to the frontiers of contemporary research in the natural sciences.
MQR-AS Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning - Courses satisfying this requirement provide an appreciation of how science generates and categorizes knowledge about nature, explore the relevance of science to society, develop proficiency in techniques of the natural sciences, and assess the limitations and strengths of science as a mode of inquiry.  These courses expose students to both the process Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning - Courses satisfying this requirement help students develop the skills to solve problems through understanding abstract, logical relationships. Such skills include mathematical analysis of data, modeling natural and manmade systems, and creating algorithms essential to computation. These courses explore specific quantitative methods, strategies for applying quantitative reasoning in diverse areas, and the intrinsic elegance of mathematics.
CA-AS Cultural Analysis - Courses in this area study human life in particular cultural contexts through interpretive analysis of individual behavior, discourse, and social practice.
HA-AS Historical Analysis - Courses in this group interpret continuities and changes—political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, artistic, scientific—through time.
KCM-AS Knowledge, Cognition, and Moral Reasoning - Offerings in this area investigate the bases of human knowledge in its broadest sense, ranging from cognitive faculties shared by humans and animals such as perception, to abstract reasoning, to the ability to form and justify moral judgments.
LA-AS Literature and the Arts - Offerings in this area explore literature and the arts in two different but related ways. Some courses focus on the critical study of artworks and on their history, aesthetics, and theory. Others are devoted to the production and performance of artworks.
SBA-AS Social and Behavioral Analysis - Courses in this area examine human life in its social context through the use of social scientific methods, often including hypothesis testing, scientific sampling techniques, and statistical analysis.

College of Engineering

CE-EN Communications in Engineering - The primary aim of courses in this area is to provide students with the opportunity to practice performing a range of engineering related communications skills within specific genres.

College of Human Ecology

PBS-HE Physical and Biological Sciences - Courses meeting this requirement include those in Introductory Life Sciences and Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Physics, Quantitative Literacy, Other Physical and Life Sciences, Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning, and Physics and Biological Sciences.
MQR-HE Statistics and Calculus courses that satisfy the Quantitative and Analytical distribution requirements.
D-HE Human Diversity - These courses address several of the college’s stated goals for undergraduate education, specifically, the expectation that in the course of earning a degree, students will enhance their abilities to communicate with people of different cultural perspectives; to listen carefully and respectfully to the views of others, especially views with which they disagree; and to employ ethical reasoning in judging ideas, actions, and their implications. These courses explore the challenges of building a diverse society, and/or examine the various processes that marginalize people and produce unequal power relations in terms of race, nationality, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, gender, age, or economic status. For transfer credit to be awarded a petition must be completed.
CA-HE Cultural Analysis - These courses study human life in particular cultural contexts through interpretive analysis of individual behavior, discourse, and social practice. Topics include belief systems (science, medicine, religion), expressive arts and symbolic behavior (visual arts, performance, poetry, myth, narrative, ritual), identity (nationality, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality), social groups and institutions (family, market, community), and power and politics (states, colonialism, inequality).
HA-HE Historical Analysis - These courses interpret continuities and changes—political, social, economic, diplomatic, religious, intellectual, artistic, scientific—through time. The focus may be on groups of people, dominant or subordinate, a specific country or region, an event, a process, or a time period.
KCM-HE Knowledge, Cognition, and Moral Reasoning - These courses investigate the bases of human knowledge in its broadest sense, ranging from cognitive faculties shared by humans and animals such as perception, to abstract reasoning, to the ability to form and justify moral judgments. Courses investigating the sources, structure, and limits of cognition may use the methodologies of science, cognitive psychology, linguistics, or philosophy. Courses focusing on moral reasoning explore ways of reflecting on ethical questions that concern the nature of justice, the good life, or human values in general.
LAD-HE Literature, the Arts and Design - These courses explore literature, the arts, and design in two different but related ways. Some courses focus on the critical study of artworks and on their history, aesthetics, and theory. These courses develop skills of reading, observing, and hearing and encourage reflection on such experiences; many investigate the interplay among individual achievement, artistic tradition, and historical context. Other courses are devoted to the production and performance of artworks and design (in creative writing, performing arts, media such as film and video, and design of physical settings and apparel). These courses emphasize the interaction among technical mastery, cognitive knowledge, and creative imagination.
SBA-HE Social and Behavioral Analysis - These courses examine human life in its social context through the use of social scientific methods, often including hypothesis testing, scientific sampling techniques, and statistical analysis. Topics studied range from the thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and attitudes of individuals to interpersonal relations between individuals (e.g., in friendship, love, conflict) to larger social organizations (e.g., the family, society, religious or educational or civic institutions, the economy, government) to the relationships and conflicts among groups or individuals (e.g., discrimination, inequality, prejudice, stigmas, conflict resolution).

Searching for Courses by Distribution Requirement

To search for courses with a specific Distribution Requirement code, enter the specific code (e.g. CA-AS or SBA-AAP) into the Search box.  Be sure to select the Find Whole Word or Phrase check box.

Using the Advanced Search feature allows for greater search refinement. For example, enter “CA-AS and Anthro” into the Advanced Search box, then only check the courses checkbox to limit your search to all courses that meet the Cultural Analysis requirement in the Department of Anthropology or that are cross-listed with Anthropology.

Important! When reviewing search results, make sure the selected course has the requested code. Search results may return other letter combinations that do not constitute course codes, or other linked courses that do not meet the criteria for a specific code.

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