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Cornell University    
 
    
 
  Feb 21, 2018
 
Courses of Study 2017-2018
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DSOC 2050 - International Development

(crosslisted) SOC 2206  
(D-AG, HA-AG, SBA-AG) (CU-SBY)     
Spring. 3-4 credits, variable. Letter grades only.

P. McMichael.

International development concerns the gains, losses and tensions associated with the process of social change - as it affects human populations, social institutions and the environment. This course considers development as an evolving world project and from the perspective of its social and ecological impact: asking questions about costs and benefits of economic growth, about the global context (geo-political, institutional, production, consumption, and discursive relations), and the sustainability of various models. We relate development trends in the South/Third World with those in the North/First World. We also examine shared, global issues, such as the environment, human rights, security, and their condition in different parts of the world. In examining development historically, we encourage students to situate trends shaping the twenty-first century world, and how they can contribute, as global citizens, to the ongoing debate about how to reformulate development as an inclusive an empowering social process.

This course combines Lectures with discussion, and uses films and section discussions to promote reflection on diversity of cultures and understandings of human development. It also includes a special component (access by instructor permission), in conjunction with Cornell’s Writing in the Majors Program. This is worth an additional credit hour, and is for advanced students. These students will meet additionally in weekly Sections with a Writing Instructor from Development Sociology for a special topic focus to enhance understanding of course material as well as writing skills.

Outcome 1: Discuss the history of development.

Outcome 2: Situate trends shaping the twenty-first century world, and how they can contribute, as global citizens, to the ongoing debate about how to reformulate development as an inclusive an empowering social process.



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