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Cornell University    
 
    
 
  Nov 24, 2017
 
Courses of Study 2017-2018
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ANTHR 7230 - [History of Archaeological Thought]

(crosslisted) ARKEO 7230  
     
Fall. Next offered 2021-2022. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

Co-meets with ANTHR 4230 /ARKEO 4230 .

A. T. Smith.

This course examines the history of archaeological interpretation and representation. Through an immersion in various genres of thought and writing, we will chart the historical development of archaeology as it has been transformed from inception to today. The course is organized into two concurrent parts. The first provides an intensive overview of the dominant positions and problems in modern archaeological theory. In this section of the course, we will explore the major historical movements in archaeological interpretation since the formalization of the discipline in the 19th century through the contemporary constellation of thematic concerns. It is in these discussions that we will strive to bring forward the subtle logics that underlie archaeological analysis. The second section of the course centers on an exploration of archaeological representation and overlapping issues raised in the sister field of historiography. In this section of the course we will discuss general issues in the philosophy of history as they bear upon the production of landmark archaeological studies, engaging with a series of pivotal research projects. By the end of the course, students should have a thorough understanding of the theoretical frameworks that underlie contemporary archaeological research and the unique problems that follow efforts to interpret and represent the archaeological record.



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