Courses of Study 2021-2022 
    
    Nov 27, 2021  
Courses of Study 2021-2022

Cornell University Course Descriptions


 

AMST—American Studies

  
  
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    AMST 4720 - [New Latinx Writing]

    (crosslisted) ENGL 4720 , LSP 4720  
    (CA-AS, ALC-AS, SCD-AS)      
    Fall or Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2023-2024. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ENGL 6720 /LSP 6720 .

    M.P. Brady.

    For description, see ENGL 4720 .

  
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    AMST 4733 - [The Future of Whiteness]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 4733 , ENGL 4733  
    (CA-AS, SCD-AS)      
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AMST 6733 /ENGL 6733 .

    S. Mohanty.

    For description, see ENGL 4733 .

  
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    AMST 4757 - Be a Man! Masculinity, Race, and Nation

    (crosslisted) ENGL 4757 , FGSS 4757 
    (CA-AS, ALC-AS, SCD-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    J. Branfman.

    For description, see ENGL 4757 .

  
  
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    AMST 4851 - Refugees

    (crosslisted) HIST 4851 , LSP 4851  
    (HA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with HIST 6851 /LSP 6851 .

    M.C. Garcia.

    For description, see HIST 4851 .

  
  
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    AMST 4900 - New World Encounters, 1500 - 1800

    (crosslisted) AIIS 4900 , HIST 4900  
    (HB) (HA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    J. Parmenter.

    For description, see HIST 4900 .

  
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    AMST 4993 - Honors Essay Tutorial I


    (CU-UGR)     


    Multi-semester course: (Fall, Spring - on demand). 4 credits. First course: R grade only (in progress).

    Permission of AMST program required. An R grade (in-progress multi-semester course) will be assigned at the end of AMST 4993. The R grade will convert to a letter grade when a grade is assigned in AMST 4994 .

    Staff.

    To graduate with honors, AMST majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an AMST faculty member and defend that thesis orally before a committee. Students interested in the honors program should consult the AMST Director of Undergraduate Study during the junior year and submit an honors application by May 1 of the junior year.

     

  
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    AMST 4994 - Honors Essay Tutorial II


    (CU-UGR)     
    Multi-semester course: (Fall - on demand, Spring). 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Permission of AMST program required.

    Staff.

    To graduate with honors, AMST majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an AMST faculty member and defend that thesis orally before a committee. Students interested in the honors program should consult the AMST Director of Undergraduate Study during the junior year and submit an honors application by May 1 of the junior year.

  
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    AMST 4998 - Inquiry in Politics and Policy

    (crosslisted) ALS 4998 , CAPS 4998 , GOVT 4998 NS 4998 , PAM 4060  
    (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)      
    Fall, Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Offered in Washington, D.C.

    D. Silbey.

    For description, see GOVT 4998 .

  
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    AMST 5710 - America’s Promise: Social and Political Context of American Education

    (crosslisted) DSOC 5710 , EDUC 5710 , SOC 5710  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Enrollment limited to: admission to the Cornell Teacher Education Program or permission of instructor. Co-meets with AMST 2710 /DSOC 2710 /EDUC 2710 /SOC 2710 .

    J. Sipple.

    For description and learning outcomes, see DSOC 5710 .

  
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    AMST 6003 - Doing Research With Marginalized Populations

    (crosslisted) ASRC 6003 , SOC 6000  
         
    Fall, Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    J.Ezell.

    For description, see ASRC 6003 .

  
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    AMST 6011 - [The American State]

    (crosslisted) GOVT 6011  
         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Permission of instructor required.

    S. Mettler.

    For description, see GOVT 6011 .

  
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    AMST 6015 - Photography and the Archive

    (crosslisted) ARTH 6015  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Permission of instructor required.

    C. Finley.

    For description, see ARTH 6015 .

  
  
  
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    AMST 6052 - [Readings in Latinx History]

    (crosslisted) HIST 6052 , LSP 6052  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2023-2024. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M.C. Garcia.

    For description, see HIST 6052 .

  
  
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    AMST 6201 - [The United States Congress]

    (crosslisted) GOVT 6201  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    D. Bateman.

    For description, see GOVT 6201 .

  
  
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    AMST 6210 - [Historical Archaeology: Capitalism, Colonialism, Race, Gender]

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 6210 , ARKEO 6210  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AMST 3200 /ANTHR 3210 /ARKEO 3210 .

    K. Jordan.

    For description, see ANTHR 6210 .

  
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    AMST 6220 - [Locke and the Philosophies of Dispossession: Indigenous America’s Interruptions and Resistances]

    (crosslisted) AIIS 6200 , PHIL 6941  
         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Recommended prerequisite: AIIS 1110  and AIIS 4000 /AIIS 6000 . Co-meets with AIIS 4200 /AMST 4220 /PHIL 4941 .

    T. Richardson.

    For description and learning outcomes, see AIIS 6200 .

  
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    AMST 6321 - Black Power Movement and Transnationalism

    (crosslisted) ASRC 6321 , HIST 6321  
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    R. Rickford.

    For description, see HIST 6321 .

  
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    AMST 6322 - [Readings in 20th Century African-American History]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 6322 HIST 6322  
         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    R. Rickford.

    For description, see HIST 6322 .

  
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    AMST 6335 - [Making Public Queer History]

    (crosslisted) FGSS 6335 , HIST 6335 , LGBT 6335  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2023-2024. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    S. Vider.

    For description, see HIST 6335 .

  
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    AMST 6336 - [Food, Identity, and Politics in the United States]

    (crosslisted) HIST 6336  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with AMST 4336 /HIST 4336 /FGSS 4336 .

    S. Vider.

    For description, see HIST 6336 .

  
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    AMST 6337 - [The 1980s: Politics, Culture, and Memory in the United States]

    (crosslisted) HIST 6337  
         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2023-2024. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with AMST 4337 /HIST 4337 .

    S. Vider.

    For description, see HIST 6337 .

  
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    AMST 6338 - Public Humanities

    (crosslisted) HIST 6338  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Permission of instructor required. For enrollment in this course, students are required to email the professor a statement, of no more than 300 words, explaining your interest in the course, your research interests, and your ideas for potential public humanities projects.

    S. Vider.

    For description, see HIST 6338 .

  
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    AMST 6352 - [Cultural History of the US]

    (crosslisted) HIST 6352  
         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    A. Sachs.

    For description, see HIST 6352 .

  
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    AMST 6424 - [Ethnoracial Identity in Anthropology, Language, and Law]

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 6424 , LAW 7231 , LSP 6424  
    (EC-LASP)     
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AMST 3424 /ANTHR 3475 /LSP 3475 .

    V. Santiago-Irizarry.

    For description, see ANTHR 6424 .

  
  
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    AMST 6585 - [American Political Thought]

    (crosslisted) GOVT 6585  
         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    J.A. Frank, A. Livingston.

    For description, see GOVT 6585 .

  
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    AMST 6596 - [Violence, Power, and Nonviolence]

    (crosslisted) GOVT 6596  
         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    A. Livingston.

    For description, see GOVT 6596 .

  
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    AMST 6606 - [The Politics of Pragmatism]

    (crosslisted) GOVT 6606  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    A. Livingston.

    For description, see GOVT 6606 .

  
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    AMST 6612 - Minoritarian Aesthetics In-And Performance

    (crosslisted) LSP 6611 , PMA 6611  
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    K. Jaime.

    For description, see PMA 6611 .

  
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    AMST 6615 - Disobedience, Resistance, Refusal

    (crosslisted) GOVT 6615  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    A. Livingston.

    For description, see GOVT 6615 .

  
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    AMST 6631 - [American Poetry: 1950-2000]

    (crosslisted) ENGL 6631  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2023-2024. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    R. Gilbert.

    For description, see ENGL 6631 .

  
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    AMST 6645 - [Democratic Theory]

    (crosslisted) GOVT 6645  
         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    J.A. Frank.

    For description, see GOVT 6645 .

  
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    AMST 6656 - Topics in Social and Political Philosophy

    (crosslisted) GOVT 6656 , PHIL 6430 
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    A. Marmor.

    For description, see PHIL 6430 .

  
  
  
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    AMST 6696 - [The Art Market]

    (crosslisted) ARTH 6696  
         
    Summer. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2023-2024. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AMST 4696 /ARTH 4696 /VISST 4696 . Offered online.

    C. Finley.

    For description, see ARTH 6696 .

  
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    AMST 6733 - [The Future of Whiteness]

    (crosslisted) ENGL 6733  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AMST 4733 /ASRC 4733 /ENGL 4733 .

    S. Mohanty.

    For description, see ENGL 6733 .

  
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    AMST 6762 - [Law, Latinxs, Illegality]

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 6762 LSP 6762  
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2023-2024. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AMST 3762 /ANTHR 3762 /LSP 3762 .

    V. Santiago-Irizarry.

    For description, see ANTHR 6762 .

  
  
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    AMST 6777 - [The United States]

    (crosslisted) ANTHR 6777 LSP 6777   
         
    Fall. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AMST 3777 /ANTHR 3777 /LSP 3777 .

    V. Santiago-Irizarry.

    For description, see ANTHR 6777 .

  
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    AMST 6809 - Urban Justice

    (crosslisted) ASRC 6819 , ENGL 6919 SHUM 6819  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to: fellowship recipients, who receive a $1500 stipend. Co-meets with ARCH 6408 .

    Staff.

    For description, see SHUM 6819 .


ANSC—Animal Science

  
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    ANSC 1101 - Contemporary Perspectives in Animal Science


         
    Fall. 1 credit. S/U grades only (no audit).

    Enrollment limited to: freshman, transfer students, or permission of instructor.

    T. Overton.

    This course offers an opportunity for incoming students to gain an appreciation for the range of issues and topics available in the Animal Science major. Faculty will present their current research and outreach activity as a means to engage students in current issues and to introduce possibilities for future research experience.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to identify research topics in Animal Science.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to explain the breadth of contemporary issues in Animal Science.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to investigate student opportunities such as student research, internships, and student organizations.

  
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    ANSC 1105 - Careers in Animal Science


         
    Spring. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Staff.

    In addition to preparing students for veterinary medicine, a degree in Animal Science is excellent background for careers in agricultural production, education, marketing, communications, and policy development, in both private and public sectors. In this course, students explore these opportunities and develop skills that will aid them in career planning.

  
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    ANSC 1120 - Sustainable Animal Husbandry


    (CU-SBY)     
    Winter, Summer. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    M. Soberon.

    Students completing this course will explore the many roles of domestic animals and the importance of their interdependence with humans; appreciate the scope, diversity, and problems related to domestic animal systems; practice using scientific literature to research issues in sustainable agriculture. This intensive course includes 25 hours of lecture and 27 hours of hands-on laboratory/ demonstrations at various field sites and facilities all within a three-week period. Topics include domestication, sustainability, companion animals, sheep, goats, swine, beef cattle, dairy cattle, nutrition, genetics, grazing, dairy products, poultry, horses and draft animals, Third World limited-resource animal systems, toxicology and lab animals. 

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to compare and contrast various domestic animal production systems.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to apply basic knowledge of animal nutrition, genetics, reproduction and physiology to domestic animal species.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to practice proper handling of livestock.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to research and critique various perspectives of issues related to sustainable domestic animal production systems using scientific journal articles.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to produce a researched outline and debate an agricultural issue of interest in sustainable agriculture.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to exchange scientific ideas with classmates.

    Outcome 7: Students will be able to synthesize a viewpoint on an issue in sustainable agriculture based on research and discussion.

  
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    ANSC 1150 - Domestic Animal Behavior and Welfare


         
    Summer. 3 credits. Student option grading (no audit).

    Prerequisite: at least one year of pre-college biology. This course is appropriate for both high school students and college-level students interested in exploring this topic. Does not meet curriculum requirements in the animal science major.

    L. Goodale.

    This course will give students an overview of and introduction to the behavior and welfare of domestic mammalian species.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to summarize and compare categories of behavior between species.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to apply the general concepts of mammalian behavior and biology to evaluate the welfare of animals in various scenarios.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to conduct scientific literature reviews.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to present their findings in written and oral formats.

  
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    ANSC 1200 - Contemporary Dairy Industry Topics and Issues


         
    Fall. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Enrollment limited to: freshman or transfer students with an interest in the dairy industry and the Dairy Fellows Program at Cornell.

    J. Giordano, B. Nguyen, T. Overton, M. Van Amburgh.

    This course is designed to expose students to current topics and issues in the U.S. and global dairy industry to create awareness and provide opportunities for developing critical thinking skills in problem solving related to dairy food production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to discuss current topics and issues relevant to the dairy industry.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to frame current topics and issues in the dairy industry as business opportunities.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to analyze various aspects of dairy food production from an environmental, financial and ethical perspective.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to use the concept of a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis to evaluate opportunities in the dairy field.

  
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    ANSC 2000 - Sustainable Food & Companion Animal Systems and Perspectives


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: Introductory level course in biology or animal science.

    D. Brown, X. Lei, K. Reed, N. Trottier, E. Won.

    This course offers students a broad view of biological, environmental, and social aspects of various animal systems for sustainable food production, economic development, and human companionship in the US and world. The mission, importance, status, and challenges of the milk, meat, egg, and fish production systems will be covered. It will also introduce the rapidly increasing ownership of horses and pets and assess their impacts on life quality and mental health of the public, global food security, and anthropogenic contribution to climate change. Integrations of scientific breakthrough, technology innovation, and societal and behavioral transformation will be explored to enhance the efficiency and environmental compatibility of various animal systems. Students will participate in discussion and case-studies for mitigations to nurture sustainability of animal systems.

    Outcome 1: Understand the roles and importance of various animal systems in providing the global and local communities with milk, meat, eggs, fish, co-products, recreation, and companionship.

    Outcome 2: Identify and analyze the major biological, economic, environmental, and social challenges and issues of the animal systems facing the US and the world.

    Outcome 3: Reveal origins and reasons of the problems hindering sustainable animal systems and propose effective and feasible solutions for overcoming these obstacles.

    Outcome 4: Evaluate various predictions of regional and global demands and impacts of the animal sourced-foods and pets.

  
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    ANSC 2100 - Practical Large Animal Handling


         
    Spring. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100  or equivalent.

    J. Waltemyer.

    The course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of handling and restraint including basic veterinary techniques pertaining to horses, beef and dairy cattle, swine, sheep, and poultry. Topics include basic animal anatomy and physiology, identifying breeds of various large animal species, breeding techniques, and general husbandry and management practices. This course is designed to enhance the large animal handling skills of animal science students.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to explain the basics of large animal husbandry and management practices.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to understand how to implement large animal handling and restraint techniques safely with various species, including horses, sheep, dairy and beef cattle, chickens and pigs.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to apply material learned in class to hands-on experience working with and caring for large animals.

  
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    ANSC 2120 - Animal Nutrition


    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2080  or equivalent. Recommended prerequisite: BIOAP 1100 .

    D. Cherney.

    Introduction to animal nutrition, including digestive physiology and metabolism of domestic animals and other species, nutrient properties and requirements for different aspects of animal production and performance, and principles of feed evaluation and ration formulation. Laboratory classes include gastrointestinal tract dissections and nutritional experiments performed on laboratory or farm animal species.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to explain the principles of mammalian nutrition, including digestive physiology and metabolism.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to determine basic nutrient requirements of livestock and other animal species, and how to meet those needs.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to conduct animal nutritional experiments, collect and analyze data, and present results in oral and written formats.

  
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    ANSC 2150 - Exotic Avian Biology and Management


    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Fall. 1 credit. S/U grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOAP 1100 , or one semester of college-level biology, or permission of instructor.

    D. Muscarella.

    This course addresses the biology and management of exotic avian species with an emphasis on Psittacines (i.e. parrots and related species). Lectures cover a comprehensive range of topics, including: an introduction to the diversity, morphology, and natural history of Psittacine species, as well as care, nutrition, behavior, disease prevention, and welfare of captive Psittacines. Pressures facing Psttacines in their natural habitat will be addressed, with an emphasis on the role of field management and captive breeding/reintroduction programs in Psittacine conservation.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to explain the taxonomy, natural history, morphological and behavioral characteristics of species that comprise the avian order Psittaciformes (i.e. parrots) - a group of highly intelligent and social birds that have been significantly impacted by human activities.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to recognize the major requirements for the care and breeding of psittacines in captivity, including: husbandry, nutrition, mate selection/reproduction, care of neonates, and disease prevention.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to discuss the anthropomorphic factors that impact wild populations of psittacines and critically assess the benefits and limitations of captive breeding & reintroduction programs as compared to in situ approaches in psittacine conservation.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to describe the various laboratory and field studies that enhanced our understanding of the cognitive capacities, social dynamics, and vocal communication abilities of psittacines, and consider how this information should inform our decisions regarding the well-being of individual parrots in captive situations and future of wild psittacine populations.

  
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    ANSC 2210 - Principles of Animal Genetics


    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level biology.

    H. Huson.

    This course focuses on the genetic foundation and improvement of domestic species. Basic cellular biology and DNA replication will lay the groundwork for understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying traits, modern genomic tool development, and analysis methods. Critical thinking towards animal breeding and management will require an understanding of heritability, population dynamics, rate of selection, and genetic and economic gain. Software and reference programs will be used to investigate animal genes and genomes, individual genotypes through DNA sequence or whole-genome marker panels, and statistical associations between traits and genetic markers. Modern examples, practical applications, and hands-on tools will be key components of this class in order to appreciate the intricacies of genetics and the future of genomic research for the improvement and management of animals.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to explain basic genetic principles including DNA replication and mutations, Mendelian inheritance, codominance, epistatis, and complex traits and how these factors effect phenotypic traits.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to interpret modern genotyping techniques, data generated, and analytical methods to critically evaluate research and identify significant details, research integrity, and outcomes.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to critically evaluate a population for decision making by calculating genotype and allele frequencies and using factors such as inbreeding, hybrid vigor, effective population size, and genetic drift as guidance.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to evaluate the pros and cons of selection schemes for implementing genetic improvement in livestock and domestic animals.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to apply genetic principles towards the improvement of the health and production of livestock and domestic animals.

  
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    ANSC 2300 - Introduction to Domestic Mammalian Behavior


         
    Fall. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100  or permission of instructor.

    L. Goodale.

    An introduction to the behavior of domestic mammals and how behavior relates to management and welfare. Course explores both normal and abnormal behavior of farm and companion animal species. Some discussion of how these behaviors relate to animal welfare is involved but behavior, its development, and it purpose within and across species, is the main focus.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to summarize and compare categories of behavior (e.g. maternal behavior) between species, noting similarities and differences as well as proposing potential costs and benefits of the behavior(s).

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to recognize and define “problem behaviors” and suggest potential causes and solutions for the behavior.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to articulate general concepts related to mammalian behavior and the study of mammalian behavior.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to critically evaluate peer-reviewed scientific articles by effectively reading, understanding, and analyzing the authors’ findings and conclusions.

  
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    ANSC 2400 - Biology of Reproduction


    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100  or two semesters of college-level biology.

    J. Allen.

    Comparative anatomy and physiology of mammalian and avian reproduction, with emphasis on domestic and laboratory animals; fertilization through embryonic development, pregnancy, and growth to sexual maturity; emphasis on physiological mechanisms and application to fertility regulation. Separate laboratory is offered to demonstrate fundamental aspects of reproduction and reproductive technology.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe the form and major functions of reproductive structures in male and females.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to explain the neuroendocrine regulation of reproductive function and the endocrine function and regulation of the testis and ovary.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to explain the production and function of male and female germ cells and their interactions required for fertilization.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to describe early embryonic development, recognition of pregnancy, placentation, and parturition.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to compare specie-specific differences in various aspects of reproductive form and function.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to explain the physiological basis for reproductive technologies such as estrous cycle regulation, gamete and embryo preservation and transfer, in vitro fertilization, and pregnancy diagnosis.

    Outcome 7: Students will be able to summarize and communicate scientific data from the primary literature on reproductive biology.

  
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    ANSC 2410 - Biology of Reproduction Lab


    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Spring. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: ANSC 2400 .

    J. Allen.

    Demonstrates fundamental principles and applied aspects of mammalian and avian reproduction. A limited number of live animals are used in some demonstrations. Dissection and examination of tissues from vertebrate animals are included in selected laboratories.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe the comparative functional reproductive anatomy and histology across a range of domestic and companion animals, wildlife species, and humans.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to describe endocrine organs and tissues and relate their developmental and functional influence on reproductive structure and function.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to explain the developmental, structural, and physiological changes in male and female germ cells required for gamete transport, fertilization, and early embryo development.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to evaluate the basis for reproductive technologies and their potential impact on genetic improvement, reproductive efficiency, and species conservation.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to explain fundamental cryobiological principles as they relate to cryopreservation of gametes, embryos, and somatic tissues for subsequent use in a broad range of reproductive technologies.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to compare species differences in placental development and function and relate differences to support of embryo and fetal development and mechanisms of parturition.

  
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    ANSC 2500 - Dairy Cattle Principles


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    B. Nguyen.

    Introduction to the background and scientific principles relating to dairy cattle production. Laboratories are designed to provide an understanding of dairy cattle production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be introduced to current topics in dairy science as well as many of the social, economic, and ethical influences that steer the dairy industry at local and global levels.

    Outcome 2: Students will develop knowledge and skills related to dairy production through the application of concepts in laboratory and field settings.

  
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    ANSC 2550 - Dairy Study Trip to Italy


    (CU-ITL)     
    Multi-semester course: (Fall). 1 credit. First course: R grade only (in progress).

    Field trip fee: TBA. Trip to Italy will be 8-10 days. Permission of instructor required. Enrollment preference given to: freshmen, sophomores and transfer students in Animal Science/Dairy Management. Multi-semester course, students must complete ANSC 2550, ANSC 2551 , and ANSC 2552  for a final grade.

    M. Van Amburgh.

    The course is an intensive study trip designed for exposure to a variety of dairy related agricultural production approaches in diverse regions of Italy. Topics will include: dairy management, profitability and the role of culture as it relates to regional cheese production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe Italian milk production, cheese production and consumer expectations and compare this to the U.S. perspective on artisinal and local food production.

    Outcome 2: Students will recognize and explain resource limitations for dairy production systems in the Italian agricultural system and provide context for that relative to future food production.

    Outcome 3: Students will analyze Italian food production systems and contrast that with the U.S. system.

  
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    ANSC 2551 - Dairy Study Trip to Italy II


    (CU-ITL)     
    Multi-semester course: (Winter). 0.5 credits. Second course: R grade only (in progress).

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2550 . Field trip fee: TBA. Trip to Italy will be 8-10 days. Permission of instructor required. Offered in Italy. Multi-semester course, students must complete ANSC 2550 , ANSC 2551, and ANSC 2552  for a final grade.

    M. Van Amburgh.

    The course is an intensive study trip designed for exposure to a variety of dairy related agricultural production approaches in diverse regions of Italy. Topics will include: dairy management, profitability, and the role of culture as it relates to regional cheese production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe Italian milk production, cheese production and consumer expectations and compare this to the U.S. perspective on artisinal and local food production.

    Outcome 2: Students will recognize and explain resource limitations for dairy production systems in the Italian agricultural system and provide context for that relative to future food production.

    Outcome 3: Students will analyze Italian food production systems and contrast that with the U.S. system.

  
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    ANSC 2552 - Dairy Study Trip to Italy III


         
    Multi-semester course: (Spring). 0.5 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2550 , ANSC 2551 . Field trip fee: TBA. Trip to Italy will be 8-10 days. Permission of instructor required. Multi-semester course, students must complete ANSC 2550 ANSC 2551 , and ANSC 2552 for a final grade.

    M. Van Amburgh.

    This three-part course includes an intensive study trip designed for exposure to a variety of dairy related agricultural production approaches in diverse regions of Italy. Topics will include: dairy management, profitability, and the role of culture as it relates to regional cheese production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe Italian milk production, cheese production and consumer expectations and compare this to the U.S. perspective on artisanal and local food production.

    Outcome 2: Students will recognize and explain resource limitations for dairy production systems in the Italian agricultural system and provide context for that relative to future food production.

    Outcome 3: Students will analyze Italian food production systems and contrast that with the U.S. system.

  
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    ANSC 2650 - Equine Biology and Management


    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100  or permission of instructor.

    L. Goodale.

    Provides the basics of equine form, function, care, management, and handling. Students learn the basic biology of the horse and how to apply this knowledge to solve problems in horse care. Hands-on labs include safe handling techniques, basic groundwork, and daily care of class horses. Short trips and tours illustrate applied concepts in horse industry and health care.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to explain the basics of horse husbandry and use this information to formulate equine management decisions.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to apply their knowledge of equine anatomy and physiology to management practices and equine health and disease.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to gather and critically evaluate information to: understand and make decisions regarding horse care; present this information and make recommendations to peers and a lay audience.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to demonstrate comfort and skill while handling and working with horses.

  
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    ANSC 3100 - Introduction to Animal Welfare


         
    Fall. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100  or equivalent.

    D. Cherney, J. Regenstein.

    Animal welfare issues are discussed, mainly for farm animals, but companion animals are also considered. Both animal specific and general areas of animal welfare are discussed.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to stand up in public and describe the pros and cons of animal systems in rational scientific fashion.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to decide what standards a food company purchasing animal agricultural inputs might apply to their purchasing. (Is McDonald’s justified in purchasing cage free eggs?)

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to determine what is an animal welfare issue based on scientific grounds.

  
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    ANSC 3300 - Fish Physiology

    (crosslisted) BIOAP 3300  
    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: one semester of introductory animal physiology (BIOAP 1100 , BIOG 1440 , BIOG 1445  or equivalent), or permission of instructor. Co-meets with ANSC 5300 /BIOAP 5300 .

    E. Won.

    Fish Physiology is an introduction to the functional biology of fish. Lecture topics will cover cellular and tissue function within key physiological systems that help fish thrive in a wide range of aquatic habitats, from mountain streams to deep-sea vents. These systems will be illustrated using a diverse variety of fish, while broader comparisons between fish and higher vertebrates will also be drawn. Discussion will integrate aquaculture, fisheries, and environmental contexts, including some of the anthropogenic challenges that fish face today and what can be done to mitigate them. Students will perform a gross dissection to identify anatomy in situ and visit an aquaculture facility (there is no separate lab section).

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to characterize various physiological systems that fish use to live in an aquatic environment.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to describe how these systems adjust to environmental changes in the short and long term.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to explain physiological differences between groups of fishes.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to explain how physiological systems in fish may be similar to, differ from, or have evolved into those in terrestrial vertebrates.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to discuss how unsustainable resource management and human perturbations in the environment affect fish at the physiological level.

  
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    ANSC 3310 - [Applied Dairy Cattle Genetics]


         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2500  and ANSC 2210 . Offered in odd-numbered years only.

    H. Huson.

    Course will review the current knowledge base of dairy cattle genetics including the genetic regulation of diseases, production and health traits. Genomic evaluation scores will be assessed with an emphasis on how to prioritize and balance genetic selection towards long-term sustainability. Mating strategies will be evaluated for the achievement of goals and impact on both the individual animal and overall herd.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe how marker assisted selection and heritability measurements are used.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to critically evaluate dairy cattle evaluation scores:
    a. Explain how they are produced and weighted.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to prioritize and balance selection criteria, including both health and production traits, towards species/breed management and long-term sustainability.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to develop mating strategies to achieve producer goals:
    a. Predict effect of AI within mating strategies.
    b. Compare and contrast commercial mating programs.
    c. Apply mating strategies using genomic selection.
    d. Predict short and long-term effects on population.

  
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    ANSC 3400 - Comparative Mammalian Reproduction


         
    Spring. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2400  or equivalent.

    S. Quirk.

    The course will examine the amazing diversity of reproductive strategies in mammals. Comparative aspects of reproductive physiology will be explored with a focus on the evolution of adaptations and strategies to optimize reproductive success in the face of challenges posed by geographical location and environment. The diversity in basic aspects of reproductive physiology will be highlighted, such as in gonadal function, estrous cycle, pregnancy and lactation. Unique features of species representing the major mammalian orders will be discussed. 

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to define basic components and mechanisms of reproductive processes in mammals.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to describe unique features of reproductive processes within given species.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to illustrate how reproductive strategies employed by a given species represent adaptations to the environment.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to compare and contrast reproductive strategies employed by closely-related vs distantly-related species.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to assess the benefits and challenges of reproductive strategies used by a species to adapt to the environment in the modern world.

  
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    ANSC 3410 - Biology of the Mammary Gland in Health and Disease

    (crosslisted) BIOAP 3410  
    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Spring. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100  or introductory course in human or animal physiology. Co-meets with ANSC 5410  and BIOAP 5410 . Offered in even-numbered years only.

    Y. Boisclair.

    The course uses the mammary gland as the platform to illustrate the integration of physiological systems in the whole animal. Lectures cover the anatomy, development and endocrinology of the gland, composition and biosynthesis of milk and diseases related to mammary gland development and function. The information comes from a variety of mammals including the mouse for development, the dairy cow for production aspects and the human for diseases.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to list the major anatomical and physiological systems of the mammary gland and articulate how they support the fully functional gland.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to describe the developmental and regulatory events leading to the formation of a fully functional mammary gland.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to name the major components of milk and trace their synthesis to specific precursors and biochemical pathways.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to explain the events leading to diseases associated with mammary development and lactation.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to evaluate the scientific literature in one area of high interest to mammary gland biology and articulate deeper knowledge of this area through a poster presentation.

  
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    ANSC 3450 - Reproductive Physiology and Management of Dairy Cattle


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2400 . Co-meets with ANSC 5450 .

    J. Giordano.

    This course integrates concepts of reproductive physiology, management, and economics of dairy cattle. Special emphasis is given to practices and technologies currently used in modern dairy operations. Laboratory sessions include hands-on learning of reproductive techniques and dairy herd management software. Concepts discussed in lecture and their respective application include: artificial insemination, rectal palpation and transrectal ultrasonography of the reproductive tract and ovaries, synchronization of estrus and ovulation, blood testing for pregnancy diagnosis, superovulation and embryo transfer, in-vitro fertilization and embryo production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to integrate basic and complex aspects of reproductive physiology of dairy cattle.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to illustrate the implications of physiological processes on reproductive management programs and herd performance.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to design and implement reproductive management strategies to fulfill the specific needs of dairy herds.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to analyze the reproductive performance of dairy herds using the latest software technologies and provide recommendations to optimize reproductive performance and farm profitability.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to employ current reproductive technologies used in the dairy industry to maximize herd performance and propagation of cattle of superior genetic value.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to recognize the value of reproductive biology, management programs, and herd performance on the overall profitability and sustainability of the dairy operation.

  
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    ANSC 3500 - Meat


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: introductory animal science and/or biology, or permission of the instructor.

    Staff.

    Biology and production of meat and meat products. The emphasis of the course is on the structure and function of muscle, bone, and other tissues as related to the process of converting animals into meat. This will include growth and development, carcass composition, properties of fresh and processed meat, microbiology, preservations, nutritive value, inspection, and sanitation. Lab will include anatomy, meat-animal slaughter, meat cutting, wholesale and retail cut identification, inspection, grading, and cooking. There will be a required half-day field trip to a commercial meat plant.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe procedures and practices for processing animals into meat and meat products.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to examine ethical and humane animal handling practices.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to explain methods to ensure high safety and palatability of meat and meat products.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to identify grading and marketing carcasses and meat.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to discuss nutritional value and safe handling, storage, and cooking of meat.

  
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    ANSC 3510 - Dairy Herd Management


    (CU-CEL)     
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2500  or permission of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: AEM 3020 .

    J. Giordano.

    Course integrates concepts of cow biology, management, economics, and sustainability of dairy operations. Special emphasis is given to management practices and technologies that affect cattle health and well-being, milk production and quality, reproduction, herd growth, milking, and environmental impact of dairy production. Basic concepts of dairy foods processing and the importance of milk quality for dairy products are covered. Laboratory sessions include hands-on learning of dairy software, analysis of alternative strategies, and decision-making. Commercial farm case studies are used to integrate concepts of biology and management learned in the course.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe general features and recognize the challenges and opportunities of the global and national dairy industry.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to understand the breadth and complexity of the biological mechanisms underpinning dairy cattle milk production, health, and reproduction and their implications on herd performance.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to evaluate the past and present performance of a dairy herd using computer software.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to recognize the implications of herd management programs and the use of technology on the profitability and sustainability of dairy farms.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to describe the methods used for milk processing and the manufacture of dairy products and recognize the implications of herd management strategies on the quality and safety of dairy products.

  
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    ANSC 3511 - Junior Dairy Fellows


    (CU-CEL)     
    Spring. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2500 .

    M. Van Amburgh.

    Designed for undergraduates who have a sincere interest in dairy production management and the dairy industry. The objective of this course is to impart further understanding of the integration and application of dairy science to dairy production enterprises and related industries. The course emphasizes a wide range of dairy- and agriculture- related businesses and personnel that work with the dairy industry worldwide.

    Outcome 1: Students will enhance knowledge of dairy science, and gain critical thinking skills in applied dairy science.

    Outcome 2: Students will develop ideas on current dairy production management topics and defend their positions through evidence-based approaches, communication and debate.

    Outcome 3: Students will develop networking skills and participate in professional meetings and field experiences related to the dairy industry.

  
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    ANSC 3540 - Dairy Cattle Herd Health


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2500  or permission of instructor.

    B. Nguyen.

    This course will introduce students to dairy herd health concepts and strategies for achieving health, productivity, and profitability goals through management.  Health and performance monitoring by the use of dairy records, disease prevention, and evidence-based approaches to management will be stressed.  Students should expect to develop their knowledge of dairy cattle diseases and health, acquire skills for implementing dairy herd management programs, and strengthen their abilities to problem solve and communicate in group settings.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of health, disease, and performance in dairy cattle and replacements.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to describe the most prevalent and highest impact health challenges in modern dairy production systems and understand management approaches for their prevention and control.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to make economical, resourceful, and ethical decisions about health management in dairy herds.

  
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    ANSC 3550 - Dairy Cattle Nutrition


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2500  or permission of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: ANSC 2120 .  Co-meets with ANSC 5550 .

    T. Overton.

    Provides a foundation in the principles of dairy cattle nutrition and dairy ration formulation with emphasis on application of feeding programs on dairy farms. Laboratory emphasizes hands-on evaluation of feeds, use of ration formulation software for ration evaluation and formulation, and case study analysis of dairy farms.

    Outcome 1: Students will develop critical thinking skills in dairy cattle nutrition and its application on dairy farms.

    Outcome 2: Students will learn how to use ration evaluation and formulation software.

    Outcome 3: Students will gain experience working in groups as part of case study farm analyses and a group project.

    Outcome 4: Students will learn how to integrate dairy cattle nutrition programs into other aspects of dairy herd management.

    Outcome 5: Students will develop verbal communication skills as part of group presentations.

  
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    ANSC 3560 - International Dairy Study Trip


    (CU-ITL)     
    Multi-semester course: (Fall). 1 credit. First course: R grade only (in progress).

    Field trip fee: TBA. Permission of instructor required. Enrollment preference given to: juniors and seniors in Animal Science/Dairy Management. Field trip location TBA. Multi-semester course, students must complete ANSC 3560, ANSC 3561 , ANSC 3562  for a final grade.

    M. Van Amburgh.

    The course is an intensive 8-10 day study trip designed for exposure to a variety of dairy related agricultural production approaches in the country of interest. Topics will include: dairy management, environmental regulations, profitability, related government support programs and the role of the culture’s impact on production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe the economics and conditions surrounding milk production and consumer expectations and compare this to the U.S.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to recognize and explain resource limitations for dairy production systems and provide context for that relative to future food production within the structure observed.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to analyze dairy food production systems and contrast that with the U.S. system.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to describe the impact of government support for agriculture development and compare that with current U.S. policy.

    Outcome 5: Students will gain an appreciation for the diversity of production systems and be able to describe the role agriculture plays in meeting the energy needs of the country and how that integrates with “green energy” policies.

  
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    ANSC 3561 - International Dairy Study Trip II


    (CU-ITL)     
    Multi-semester course: (Winter). 0.5 credits. Second course: R grade only (in progress).

    Prerequisite: ANSC 3560 . Field trip fee: TBA. Permission of instructor required. Field trip location TBA. Multi-semester course, students must complete ANSC 3560 , ANSC 3561, and ANSC 3562  for a final grade.

    M. Van Amburgh.

    The course is an intensive 8-10 day study trip designed for exposure to a variety of dairy related agricultural production approaches in the country of interest. Topics will include: dairy management, environmental regulations, profitability, related government support programs and the role of the culture’s impact on production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe the economics and conditions surrounding milk production and consumer expectations and compare this to the U.S.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to recognize and explain resource limitations for dairy production systems and provide context for that relative to future food production within the structure observed.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to analyze dairy food production systems and contrast that with the U.S. system.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to describe the impact of government support for agriculture development and compare that with current U.S. policy.

    Outcome 5: Students will gain an appreciation for the diversity of production systems and be able to describe the role agriculture plays in meeting the energy needs of the country and how that integrates with “green energy” policies.

  
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    ANSC 3562 - International Dairy Study Trip III


         
    Multi-semester course: (Spring). 0.5 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 3560 , ANSC 3561 . Field trip fee: TBA. Permission of instructor required. Field trip location TBA. Multi-semester course, students must complete ANSC 3560 ANSC 3561 , and ANSC 3562 for a final grade.

    M. Van Amburgh.

    This is the third of a three-semester course that includes an intensive study trip designed for exposure to a variety of dairy related agricultural production approaches in in the country of interest. Topics will include: dairy management, environmental regulations, profitability, related government support programs and the role of the culture’s impact on production.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe the economics and conditions surrounding milk production and consumer expectations and compare this to the U.S.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to recognize and explain resource limitations for dairy production systems and provide context for that relative to future food production within the structure observed.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to analyze dairy food production systems and contrast that with the U.S. system.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to describe the impact of government support for agriculture development and compare that with current U.S. policy.

    Outcome 5: Student will gain an appreciation for the diversity of production systems and be able to describe the role agriculture plays in meeting the energy needs of the country and how that integrates with “green energy” policies.

  
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    ANSC 3600 - Beef Cattle


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Offered in even-numbered years only.

    Staff.

    Management of nutrition, selection, health, and reproduction of beef cattle. Lectures and laboratories give students practical knowledge of beef production and the scientific background for improving management practices. Students feed and care for feedlot calves several times throughout the semester. 

    Outcome 1: Students will acquire knowledge of beef cattle production and management.

    Outcome 2: Students will gain practical experience through practice and simulation of management activities.

  
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    ANSC 3700 - Immunology in Animal Health and Disease


    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of majors-level biology. Co-meets with ANSC 6700 .

    L. Goodale.

    Covers selected concepts in immunology, with a focus on those that are important to domestic animal health and disease prevention. Students learn how to apply their knowledge of immunological principles to understand current literature, research, and practices.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to identify the different types of immune cells and their function.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to describe how innate and adaptive immune systems function to defend the host against infections by bacteria, fungi and viruses, and in immune disorders.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to discuss the role of vaccines in disease prevention.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to recognize how the host environment can modulate immune responses.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to explain common techniques that are used in current basic and clinical immunology research and diagnostics.

  
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    ANSC 3800 - [Sheep]


         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Offered in odd-numbered years only.

    N. Kochendoerfer.

    Breeding, feeding, management, and selection of sheep. Lectures and laboratories are designed to give students practical knowledge of managing sheep for meat, milk, and wool production as well as the scientific background for improving management practices. Students spend several days during the semester feeding and caring for ewes and their newborn lambs and milking ewes in a dairy setting.

    Outcome 1: Students will acquire knowledge of sheep production and management.

    Outcome 2: Students will gain experience through practice and simulation of management activities.

  
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    ANSC 3850 - Dairy Sheep Management


         
    Fall, Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2100  or ANSC 3800 , or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to: juniors and seniors or permission of instructor.

    N. Kochendoerfer, J. Waltemyer.

    Management and milking sheep to produce dairy products for human consumption. Complements ANSC 3800  (Sheep), which is a suggested, but not required, prerequisite, with in-depth knowledge and practice about the biology and management of sheep used for milk production, including the increased economic and environmental sustainability of dairy sheep. Laboratory sessions will focus on practical management and milking skills. Students will do twice weekly 7 am or 5 pm sessions to milk and care for ewes and lambs. Students will be guided to develop a term paper that describes an example small sheep dairy or farmstead creamery. At the conclusion of the course, students will have the knowledge to analyze, understand, and operate small ruminant dairy systems.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to explain the basic concepts of milk component synthesis and milk component composition of sheep milk in contrast with other ruminant milks, and describe the influence of nutrition, genetics, and environment on milk components.

    Outcome 2: Students will create a business plan for a small dairy sheep operation or a farmstead creamery that will include design, budget, management, and marketing elements.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to identify the advantages and disadvantages of different sheep milking and management systems.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to explain the processes to make and market sheep milk products.

  
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    ANSC 3900 - Animal Welfare Science Journal Club


         
    Spring. 1 credit. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2300  or ANSC 3100 . Co-meets with ANSC 5900 .

    L. Goodale.

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to select, critically evaluate, and discuss current scientific literature and to expand their understanding of the science of animal welfare. Students will meet once a week with the instructor for a journal club-style discussion. Papers will be selected by that week’s student presenter (and approved by the instructor) from a provided list of current issues of several animal welfare journals. Group discussions will focus on the merits of the research presented, validity and relevance of the findings, and the significance of the work in the field. Two structured lectures will begin the course and will cover topics including: choosing a scientific article, evaluating study design, interpreting figures, basic statistics, and how to present in a journal club setting.

    Outcome 1: Students will select scientific journal articles to further their understanding of a subject of interest.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to critically evaluate scientific literature, including analysis of: literature reviews; study design; basic statistical analyses; whether conclusions are supported by sufficient evidence.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to discuss current scientific literature in a thoughtful manner.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to explain scientific findings to their peers.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to describe recent advances in understanding in the field of animal welfare science.

  
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    ANSC 3920 - [Mechanisms of Animal Growth and Development]


    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100  or equivalent introductory physiology courses. Offered in odd-numbered years only.

    Y. Boisclair.

    A course on the basic biology of animal growth and development. The course relies on data obtained from a variety of species to describe whole animal growth patterns through life and the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning the formation of key tissues. Lecutres cover (1) patterns of whole-animal growth during fetal and postnatal life; (2) molecular and cellular basis of formation and development of skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and bone; (3) regulation of growth and development by hormones and growth factors. 

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe animal growth from embryonic life to maturity. Contrast the growth of individual tissues over time. Use this information to explain changes in body composition throughout life.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to be familiar with the major developmental events leading to the formation of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to understand the role of major transcription factors in control of differentiation and growth of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to name the major components of the growth hormone (GH) -insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and leptin systems. Understand the role of each system in coordinating specific aspects of growth (e.g., linear growth for the GH-IGF system; energy partition and lipid deposition for the leptin system).

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to explain how events occurring during fetal life can exert long lasting effects after birth. Trace these long-lasting effects to specific mechanisms taking place during fetal or early postnatal life.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to evaluate the scientific literature in one area of high interest to biology of growth and articulate deeper knowledge in this area through a poster presentation.

  
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    ANSC 3980 - [Animals in Biomedical Research]


         
    Spring. Not offered: 2021-2022. Next offered: 2022-2023. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level biology; BIOAP 1100  or equivalent introductory physiology course. Offered in odd-numbered years only.

    X. Lei.

    This course introduces features and applications of various animal models and related cutting-edge tools for biomedical research on human health and diseases. Examples will be given on appropriate animal models for studying human diseases related to diabetes, bone, infection, brain, eye, and nutritional deficiencies. Model species include food-producing animals, recreational/companion animals, and laboratory animals. Lectures cover basic biology, common uses of animals in biomedical research, and unique applications of selected species for target human disease. Comparative physiology between model species and humans, advantages and limitations of given models, regulations of biomedical uses of animals, and combined applications of animal models with omics, machine learning, and big data are also discussed. 

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to recognize the importance, contribution, and potential of animal models for biomedical research.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to explain physiological bases and molecular mechanisms of animals in modelling human health and disease.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to describe established animal models for studying pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of common human diseases.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to understand the physiological basis of animals as models of human health and disease.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to explore novel animal models, new applications, and rewarding careers for biomedical research.

    Outcome 6: Student will be aware of limitations and regulations of animal models for biomedical research.

  
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    ANSC 4020 - Seminar in Animal Sciences


    (CU-UGR)     
    Spring. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: students engaged in undergraduate honors research projects.

    S. Quirk.

    Reports of undergraduate honors research projects. Students present oral reports of their work for class discussion in addition to written reports.

  
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    ANSC 4110 - Integrated Cattle Nutrition


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100  and ANSC 2120 , or equivalent. Recommended prerequisite: ANSC 3550 . Enrollment limited to: juniors, seniors, and entering graduate students.

    M. Van Amburgh.

    Integrates concepts of cattle nutrition and farm nutritional management to help students understand and appreciate factors influencing the performance of cattle under diverse conditions. Topics include the effect of environment on maintenance costs; the nutrient requirements for various stages of growth, lactation, and pregnancy; rumen function; feed composition and chemistry; nutrient partitioning; and the environmental impacts of cattle and how to minimize them. Computer models (Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System) are used in the laboratory to actualize the information presented in lectures. Herd case studies are used in lab and there are field trips to farms to evaluate the nutritional management.

  
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    ANSC 4120 - Whole-Farm Nutrient Management


    (CU-SBY)     
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Recommended prerequisite: ANSC 4110 . Enrollment limited to: juniors and seniors. Co-meets with ANSC 6120 .

    Q. Ketterings, M. Van Amburgh.

    Provides students with an understanding of the concepts and practices underlying whole-farm nutrient management planning of livestock and dairy farms. Improving profitability and efficiency are key factors considered while improving air and water quality associated with dairy production. Students learn about nutrient management on (Concentrated) Animal Feeding Operations ((C)AFO’s) and conduct a whole farm nutrient balance for a farm of choice. This course integrates crop and manure management with nutrition and herd management to provide a broad but focused and action-oriented approach. The course utilizes three software programs for nutrient management planning and herd nutritional management: Cropware, the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS), and the Whole Farm Nutrient Mass Balance program. Current topics are also discussed, such as greenhouse gas emissions and impacts of dairy and livestock production and local versus global food production and environmental impacts.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe the current environmental policies for agriculture and environmental management nationwide and in New York and explain the reasons the having such policies in place.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to understand nutrient cycling across various management units on the farm and discuss and debate the importance of and benefits of nutrient management and whole farm planning for the agricultural industry.

    Outcome 3: Students will know where to find nutrient management information including standards for management and land grant university guidelines.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to explain the components of a certified nutrient management plan and demonstrate understanding of nutrient management planning in conversations with planning and plan evaluation professional in the industry.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to evaluate and compare the whole farm planning and management system of a farm from soil to crops to cows and back, and recommend changes for improvements in agriculture and environmental management in future years.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to recognize the importance of agricultural industry involvement in addressing production and environmental challenges and setting policy and constructively communicate with and debate with policy makers.

    Outcome 7: Students will be able to recognize and be able to describe the role dairy cattle play in utilizing byproducts of the human food chain that contribute to reducing the environmental impact of all human food production.

  
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    ANSC 4140 - Ethics and Animal Science


         
    Spring. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Enrollment limited to: juniors or seniors. Co-meets with ANSC 5140 .

    D. Cherney.

    Explores the place of humans in the biological world, origins of ethics and morality, speciesism, the use of animals for research and agricultural purposes, and transgenic animals.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe the main philosophical frameworks used in animal ethics and compare and contrast the may factors that influence decisions about animal use and reflect on your own ethical judgements.

    Outcome 2: Students will know how to recognize an ethical issue (as opposed to opinion, fact, emotion, etc.).

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to understand your stance on production animal ethical issues and how to present your argument.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to demonstrate appropriate written and oral communication skills and your ability to work effectively as part of a team.

  
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    ANSC 4200 - Nutrition of Felids and Canids


         
    Fall. 2 credits. Letter grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2120 . Co-meets with ANSC 6200 .

    N. Trottier.

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid foundation of knowledge on cat and dog nutrition to prepare them for careers in animal nutrition research, veterinary medicine, and the pet food industry. The course is divided into 5 modules. The first part of the course discusses ingredient and nutrient requirements of felids and canids by teaching students to integrate knowledge of evolutionary feeding habits, gastrointestinal anatomy, digestive processes, and nutrient metabolism. The second part covers practical feedings through the teaching of feed ingredient sourcing and processing, and the pet food manufacturing regulations. The third focusses on metabolic disorders of nutrient metabolism. Learning activities consist of daily student reflections, designing hypothesis-driven questions, discussing peer-reviewed articles, and presenting a final project.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to evaluate ingredient and nutrient adequacy of commercial foods for domestic felids and canids.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to participate in the development and implementation of basic feeding programs for exotic felids and canids.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to recognize best feeding practices for a domestic felid and canid with a given common underlying metabolic disorder.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to design a complete feed for a domestic felid and canid.

  
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    ANSC 4270 - Fundamentals of Endocrinology

    (crosslisted) BIOAP 4270  
         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: animal or human physiology course or permission of instructor. Co-meets with ANSC 6270 /BIOAP 6270 .

    S. Quirk., Y.A. Ren.

    Physiology and regulation of endocrine secretions. Emphasizes neuroendocrine, reproductive, growth, and metabolic aspects of endocrinology. Examples are selected from many animals, including humans.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to define the organization of the endocrine system with a focus on mammals.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to explain the physiological function of major hormones and interactions among components of the endocrine system to control homeostasis.

    Outcome 3: Student will, for each major hormone, describe its cellular source, biosynthesis, chemical nature, storage, factors controlling its secretion, cellular mechanisms of action on target cells, and physiological functions.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to discuss how the roles of hormones change during developmental processes.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to predict the consequences of disturbances in components of the endocrine system.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to illustrate how basic scientific research as well as clinical studies of endocrine disorders contribute to the advancement of basic knowledge and development of therapeutic strategies for endocrine disorders.

    Outcome 7: Students will be able to appraise how the acquisition of knowledge about the endocrine system is ongoing and how key advances in technology from multiple fields (physiology, cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics) have promoted advancements in knowledge of the endocrine system.

  
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    ANSC 4280 - Comparative Nutrition of the Horse and Pig


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisites: BIOAP 1100 , ANSC 2120 , and ANSC 2650 . Co-meets with ANSC 6280 .

    N. Trottier.

    Throughout their evolution, members of the Suidae family have adopted omnivorous feeding strategies of great elasticity. They share similar gastrointestinal physiological traits with the Equidae family members, which have remained strict obligate herbivores. Learning nutrition of the domestic horse and pig under the same umbrella offers a way to exploit their differences and similarities and understand the underlying factors that dictate their nutrient and feed requirements. The course covers the following topics using a comparative approach between the two species: gastrointestinal anatomy and digestive processes, feed ingredients and composition, feeding behavior and management, and diet-induced metabolic disorders. Learning activities include discussions, weekly journaling, monthly short research papers, gastrointestinal tract dissections, diet evaluation and formulation, field trips, and hands-on feeding trial(s).

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to recommend best feeding practices to maintain health and wellbeing of horses and pigs.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to formulate a simple diet, by hand, for a pig at a given stage of life cycle.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to formulate a simple diet, by hand, for a horse at a given stage of life cycle.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to evaluate the nutritional adequacy of a given equine and swine diet.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to use models and computer programs to formulate a given equine and swine diet.

  
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    ANSC 4290 - Current Topics in Cat and Dog Nutrition


         
    Spring. 1 credit. S/U grades only (no audit).

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2120 . Recommended prerequisites: ANSC 4200 . Enrollment limited to: juniors and seniors. Co-meets with ANSC 6290 .

    N. Trottier.

    This course presents current topics presented by experts in the field. The speakers are scientists from the pet food industry, academia, government, and veterinary practice. Speakers discuss with each of you about topics they have extensive expertise in. This course is a unique opportunity for each of you to learn about the structure of the pet food industry, the role of research in advancing our understanding of cat and dog nutrition, the regulatory and safety aspects of pet food manufacturing, novel feed ingredient applications and health consequences, efficacy of supplements, and learning from exotic canids and felids. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the industry of cat and dog nutrition.

    Outcome 1: Explain the safety and compliance regulations for manufacturing pet foods.

    Outcome 2: Recognize the diverse areas of work and disciplines available in the pet food industry.

    Outcome 3: Explain the role of research in the pet food industry.

    Outcome 4: Recognize the importance of source of information regarding pet foods

  
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    ANSC 4400 - Tools for a Career in Research

    (crosslisted) BIOMS 4400  
    (OPHLS-AG)      
    Fall. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: 20 credit hours in science and/or technology courses.

    S. Quirk.

    Students will explore avenues for careers in research. Course exercises will help students define their interests and identify career paths, employment opportunities and programs for post-graduate study. They will assess their qualifications to identify ways to improve their preparation for a research career. Students will gain experience in skills such as writing a resume and personal statement, developing contacts to serve as professional references and preparing for an interview. They will obtain practice delivering a research seminar and writing a research proposal. Each stage of the research career will be discussed.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to evaluate their interests in various careers that include research.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to assess whether they are on a path to acquire the skills needed to pursue a career in research.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to discover potential routes to train for a career in research.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to present themselves professionally in applications for research positions.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to prepare a resume and personal statement.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to investigate a scientific topic of interest and identify unanswered questions to formulate a short research proposal.

    Outcome 7: Students will be able to design and present a seminar on a scientific topic of interest.

  
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    ANSC 4410 - Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: BIOAP 1100 , ANSC 2120  or equivalents. Enrollment limited to: juniors and seniors. Co-meets with ANSC 6410 .

    J. McFadden.

    The course will integrate animal nutrition, biochemistry, and physiology. The overall goal is to enhance understanding of intermediary metabolism and metabolic adaptations that develop to support different physiological states. The comparative study of biochemistry across mammalian species will be emphasized. The structural and functional roles of biochemicals and the ability of hormones to influence their metabolic fate will be highlighted.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to integrate basic and complex metabolic pathways that converge to maintain energy homeostasis and life in mammals.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to identify shifts in metabolism that develop to support changes in physiological states such as starvation, growth, pregnancy, and lactation.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to define the relationship between nutrition and metabolism with an emphasis on anabolic and catabolic reactions that are specific for unique tissues.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to compare and contrast nutritional physiology and biochemistry in various mammalian species with conserved metabolic adaptations to support their survival in unique environments.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to recognize the critical role of endocrine hormones on energy metabolism.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to define key intracellular signaling pathways that fundamentally link endocrine hormones with their metabolic action.

    Outcome 7: Students will be able to gain an understanding of nutritional physiology and biochemistry within the context of contemporary animal production challenges that influence health and performance.

  
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    ANSC 4500 - Lab Animal Reproduction


         
    Fall. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2400 .

    J. Allen

    This course provides an in-depth study of the reproductive anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of laboratory and companion animals. Species studied will include the cat, dog, rat, rabbit, chicken, Xenopus, zebrafish, and fruit fly, and students will make comparisons among species. We will examine the application of reproductive technologies to related wildlife species and the use of animal models for understanding reproductive function and dysfunction. The class period will be divided into a 1 hour lecture followed by 1 hour of discussions, group projects, and/or laboratory exercises. Close readings of scientific papers will be emphasized. In addition, students will be exposed to current research performed by CU faculty.  

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to describe the reproductive anatomy and physiology in mammals, birds, amphibians, fish, and insects using laboratory and companion animals as models.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to compare and contrast reproductive anatomy and physiology among species studied.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to evaluate contemporary scientific literature about reproductive biology.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to integrate data into a review of the scientific literature.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to create experiments with fruit flies to answer questions in reproductive biology.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to collaborate and lead group discussions on current research in reproductive biology.

  
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    ANSC 4510 - Dairy Herd Business Management


    (CU-CEL)     
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2500  or equivalent, ANSC 3510 , ANSC 3511 , and AEM 3020 , or permission of instructor.

    J. Karszes, M. Van Amburgh.

    Emphasizes dairy herd business management with application to herd management analysis. Laboratory includes farm tours and analysis.

    Outcome 1: Students will develop critical thinking skills in business and financial decision making.

    Outcome 2: Students will gain experience in developing group based business outcomes through classroom discussion and interaction in support of their decision making process.

    Outcome 3: Students will gain perspective about real-life decisions through interactions with dairy farm families and employees, along with actual financial data pertaining to the business.

    Outcome 4: Students will learn how to think extemporaneously and develop verbal communication skills.

  
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    ANSC 4560 - Dairy Management Fellowship


    (CU-CEL)     
    Spring. 2 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2500 , ANSC 3510 , AEM 3020 ANSC 3511  and ANSC 4510 . Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to: seniors.

    M. Van Amburgh.

    Designed for undergraduates who have a sincere interest in dairy farm management. The course objective is to gain further understanding of the integration and application of dairy farm management principles and programs with respect to progressive dairying and related industries. There are field trips focusing on dairy farm business analyses and feedback, along with other experiential learning activities and professional development and networking opportunities. Field trips will be held on announced Saturdays throughout the course of the semester.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to conduct comprehensive dairy farm business evaluations that includes financial, human resource, herd level and CAFO level decision making and provide real-time feedback to the owner and manager and integrate sustainability and generational transfer as components of the process.

    Outcome 2: Students will be able to recognize how and develop the skill to transfer business equity among generations and how to do the same thing with non-family partners while maintaining the viability of the business. This includes the use of insurance and other risk management tools available.

    Outcome 3: Students will be able to recognize potential risks to the business (financial, environmental, market, human and animal welfare) how to use current tools to mitigate or minimize risk and develop the appropriate approach to ensure profitability and sustainability of the business.

    Outcome 4: Students will be able to properly identify actual and perceived risks by consumers and non-producers and further to effectively communicate a response to such inquiries and to take appropriate action when needed.

    Outcome 5: Students will be able to identify how and why conflict arises in family business and develop appropriate strategies for overcoming the conflict to minimize the effect of conflict on family and business function and dynamics.

 

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