Courses of Study 2013-2014 
    
    Jun 13, 2024  
Courses of Study 2013-2014 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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BIOEE 2670 - Introduction to Conservation Biology

(crosslisted)
(also NTRES 2670 ) (PBS)
Fall. 2-3 credits, variable.

Three credits includes disc sec, two Sat a.m. field trips, and two essays. Intended for both science and nonscience majors. May not be taken for credit after NTRES 4100 . Completion of BIOEE 2670/NTRES 2670  not required for NTRES 4100 .

J. Fitzpatrick.

Broad exploration of biological concepts and practices related to conserving the earth’s biodiversity; integrates ecological, evolutionary, behavioral, and genetic principles important for understanding conservation issues of the 21st century. Topics include species and ecosystem diversity, values of biodiversity, causes of extinction, risks facing small populations, simulation modeling, design of nature preserves, the Endangered Species Act, conservation priority-setting, species recovery, ecosystem restoration and management, implications of climate change, and our ecological footprint.

Outcome 1: Students will be conversant in the key threats to biodiversity in the 21st century, and how biological principles are being applied in understanding these threats and devising solutions for maintaining species and ecosystems.

Outcome 2: Students will learn why preserving biological diversity is important for human well-being.

Outcome 3: Students will learn how our most important legal frameworks for protecting biodiversity relate directly to the biology and ecology of organisms.

Outcome 4: Students will learn how modern approaches to land management and ecosystem restoration differ from the traditional approaches still practiced by many federal, state, and local natural resource agencies.

Outcome 5: Completion of this course provides introductory-level expertise useful for students in fields of study both inside and outside of the sciences, including natural resources, landscape architecture, communication, economics, public policy, and the humanities.



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