Courses of Study 2012-2013 
    
    Jul 04, 2022  
Courses of Study 2012-2013 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Romance Studies


In the College of Arts and Sciences .


Course Offerings 

The Department of Romance Studies offers courses in the following areas: French, Hispanic, Italian, and Luso-Brazilian literatures; French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish languages; Francophone, Italian, Luso-Brazilian, and Hispanic cultures; and linguistics and semiotics. Through its course offerings and opportunities for independent study, the department seeks to encourage study of the interactions of the Romance literatures among themselves, with other literatures, and with other fields of inquiry. The department also offers courses in Czech, Hungarian, Polish, and Romanian.

Website: www.arts.cornell.edu/romance/

Faculty


T. Campbell, chair; T. Beviá, associate chair; G. Aching, T. Alkire, S. Amigo-Silvestre, M. Baraldi, K. Bättig von Wittelsbach, M. Beviá, B. Bosteels, F. Cervesi, L. Dubreuil, P. Erber, T. Fallman, E. Fernández (visiting), M. A. Garcés, F. Glidja, M. Greenberg, C. Howie, P. Keller, C. Lawless, S. LoBello, K. Long, J. Luks, N. Maldonado-Méndez, T. McNulty, M. Migiel, J. Oliveira, J. E. Paz-Soldán, S. Pinet, K. Pinkus, M. K. Redmond, W. Reyes-Cubides, J. Routier-Pucci, S. Selenu, C. Sparfel, B. Teutli,  M. C. Vallois, C. Waldron. Emeriti: C. Morón Arroyo, J. Béreaud, A. Colby-Hall, N. Furman, R. Klein, P. Lewis, A. Seznec. Adjunct Professor: Anne Berger. Adjunct Associate Professor: S. Tarrow.

French:


T. Alkire, L. Dubreuil, F. Glidja, M. Greenberg, C. Howie, S. LoBello, K. Long, J. Luks, T. McNulty, C. Sparfel, M. C. Vallois, C. Waldron. Emeriti: J. Béreaud, A. Colby-Hall, N. Furman, D. I. Grossvogel, P. Lewis, A. Seznec. Adjunct Professor: A. Berger. Adjunct Associate Professor: S. Tarrow.

The Major:


French is a national language in 28 countries and is spoken widely in at least 18 more. The French brought the world the Bayeux Tapestry (arguably the world’s first comic strip), Versailles, Impressionism, Surrealism, New Wave cinema, Poststructuralist Theory, and many other movements and works that have been influential for world culture.

The major in French is divided into two tracks: French literature and French cultural studies. Prospective majors should try to plan their programs as far ahead as possible, especially if they intend to study abroad. For further information, students are asked to consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Track 1: French Literary Studies:


This option is designed to give students mastery of the oral and written language, as well as knowledge and understanding of French and Francophone literatures and cultures, and to develop their skills in literary analysis.

Track 2: French Cultural Studies:


This option is designed to give students mastery of the oral and written language, as well as a broader knowledge of French and Francophone culture in an interdisciplinary context.

The Following Rules Apply to Both Tracks:


Three of the non-core courses must be in French (either taught in Romance Studies or in a Cornell-approved study abroad program in a Francophone country) and be on French or Francophone subjects. Only courses above the level of FREN 3130  can count toward the major. Two courses may be in English and/or in related fields (e.g., History, Art History, Government, Anthropology, Sociology); 50 percent of the subject matter in these courses must be related to France or the Francophone worlds.

One of these courses must be on pre-1789 literature or culture; one must be on Francophone literature or culture; and one must be at the 4000-level. Please note that in some classes, one course may cover two of these requirements (for example, a 4000-level course may also be on a pre-1789 topic, such as Medieval or Early Modern literature or culture).

Only courses for which students receive a grade of B- or higher can count for the major.  None of the courses counted for the major may be taken for S/U grades.

Students are encouraged to study abroad through Cornell-sponsored or Cornell-approved programs, such as EDUCO in Paris. When appropriate, this work can be counted toward the required course work for the major. Students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies of French, the Study Abroad advising dean, and Cornell Abroad, as well as with their faculty advisor before taking courses abroad to assure that they are appropriate.

Administration of the French Major:


Students are admitted to the major by the director of undergraduate studies but are guided by their individual advisors. A copy of each student’s progress is given to the director of undergraduate studies for approval and safe-keeping.

Minor in French Studies:


The purpose of the minor in French Studies is to supplement a student’s major with a complementary focus or concentration that is indicated on the graduate’s transcript. Organized by the interdisciplinary Program in French Studies, it is designed to be compatible with all kinds of majors and is open to students in all the undergraduate colleges. The minor promotes broad understanding of French culture, as well as Francophone literatures, societies, and their political/economic systems; it also encourages students to refine and practice their language skills. Students pursuing the minor must attain proficiency (by taking a placement exam or completing a 2000-level course in French) and must take the core course FREN 2240 - [The French Experience]  or an approved equivalent of the core course (such as FREN 2270 - Versions of Versailles  or FREN 2210 - Reading, Looking, Thinking: Introduction to Interpretation ). Students may also petition the program director to use an advanced course conducted in French as their core course. Completion of the minor requires, in addition to the core, three nonlanguage courses on French and Francophone topics. Only one of the four courses required for the minor can be taken for S–U grades.

Study Abroad in France:


French majors or other interested students may study in France for one or two semesters during their junior year. Opting for one of several study-abroad plans recognized by the Department of Romance Studies facilitates the transfer of credit. Information about these plans is available from the director of undergraduate studies.

Students must be Cornell undergraduates with a strong academic record. The minimum French preparation is the completion of FREN 2190  or its equivalent in advanced credit or placement by the Cornell CASE examination. Taking FREN 3010  or FREN 3050 , or even FREN 3120  or FREN 3130  is, however, strongly recommended. Students interested in studying in France are encouraged to consider the special benefits offered by EDUCO, the program in Paris cosponsored by Cornell, Emory, Tulane, and Duke Universities. EDUCO offers advanced students a challenging course of study and the experience of total immersion in French life and culture in Paris. Participants in this program may spend the year or the semester as fully matriculated students at the Universities of Paris VII or IV and other institutions of higher learning in Paris, including the possibility of study at the Institut d’Etudes des Sciences Politiques (Sciences Po), selecting courses in many fields from the regular university course offerings. Students begin the academic year with an intensive three-week orientation in French history, society, and daily life. While it is possible to enroll in the EDUCO Program for one semester, admission will be offered first to students planning to study abroad for the full academic year. Up to 3 courses taken abroad may count toward the French major.

EDUCO maintains a center in Paris with full support staff. The resident director, chosen annually from the Cornell, Emory, Tulane, and Duke faculties, teaches a special seminar each semester, provides academic advice, and helps ensure the quality of the courses. The center, which includes a small library and word-processing facilities, is regularly used by students for special tutorials, seminars, and lectures, as well as informal gatherings.

Honors. The honors program encourages well-qualified students majoring in French literature and culture to do independent work in French beyond the required course work for the major. The preparation of the senior honors essay, generally spread over two semesters, provides a unique learning opportunity, since it allows for wide reading and extensive rewriting to a degree not possible in the case of course papers.

To be eligible for honors, students must have a general grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in the French major.

No special seminars or courses are required of honors students, but they will have regular meetings with the faculty advisors who have agreed to supervise their work. They may receive course credit by enrolling in FREN 4290 FREN 4300 , but these independent study courses must be taken in addition to the courses that meet the minimum requirements for the major. At the end of the senior year, each honors student is examined orally on the honors essay by a jury consisting of his or her faculty advisor and two other faculty members. The senior essay is to be made available for reading by the jury on or before April 15. The awarding of honors is determined by the student’s grades in the major and the quality of the honors essay.

Italian:


T. Alkire, M. Baraldi, K. Bättig von Wittelsbach, T. Campbell, F. Cervesi, M. Migiel, K. Pinkus, S. Selenu. 

The Major:


The major in Italian at Cornell readies students both in the language and cultural context of Italy. Students gain proficiency in speaking, writing, listening and reading in Italian and learn about Italian culture and literature across different historical periods, different media, and different regions.  Students learn to perform close readings, providing the relevant historical contexts for the most significant Italian cultural artifacts across the peninsula’s eight hundred-year history. Finally, students develop the ability to form critical judgments on Italian cultural works, while having learned to appreciate and evaluate cultural and literary expressions according to the varying modes of perceiving, experiencing, and understanding related to Italian culture.

Completing the major, students will be able to demonstrate:

  • Oral, aural and written proficiency in Italian.
  • Training in the centuries-long traditions of Italian literature and culture.
  • Training and familiarity with a variety of methodologies for studying literature and culture.
  • Skill in expressing themselves both in writing and orally on topics related to Italian culture and literature.
  • International and interdisciplinary exposure.

Eight courses are required for the major in Italian:


  1. Students must take ITAL 2190 - Italian Intermediate Composition and Conversation II  (or equivalent course).
  2. Students must take ITAL 2900 - [Perspectives in Italian Culture]  (or equivalent course), offered in English in Spring; OR ITAL 2950 - The Cinematic Eye of Italy  (or equivalent course). Students who elect to take both of these classes may count them both toward the total of eight courses required for the major. Note that Ital 2900 has no prerequisites and may be taken at any time.
  3. Students must take ITAL 2970 - Introduction to Italian Literature-Utopia and Justice  (or equivalent course), offered in Italian in Fall.
  4. Students must take at least five electives at the 2000-level or above from an approved list of courses offered in Romance Studies or other departments such as History, Architecture, History of Art, Government, Sociology, and so on.  We strongly urge majors to take as many of these electives as possible in Italian.  At least one of these five electives must focus on a period prior to the 1800s, and no more than three of these five electives may be taken in English.

No more than three of the total of eight courses toward the major may be taken abroad or at an institution other than Cornell.

Students majoring in Italian are encouraged to study abroad, especially at the Bologna Consortial Study Program, where linguistic as well as cultural competence is emphasized. Students enroll at the University of Bologna and can take a wide variety of courses in Italian literature and culture in fields such as history, philosophy, government, and art history.

Qualified students are encouraged to pursue Honors in Italian, writing and researching a thesis in close consultation with the faculty in Italian.

Minor in Italian:


Five courses are required to complete the minor in Italian:

  1. Students must take ITAL 2190 - Italian Intermediate Composition and Conversation II  (or equivalent course).
  2. Students must take ITAL 2900 - [Perspectives in Italian Culture]  (or equivalent course), offered in English in Spring; OR ITAL 2950 - The Cinematic Eye of Italy  (or equivalent course). Students who elect to take both of these classes may count them both toward the total of five classes required for the minor. Note that Ital 2900 has no prerequisites and may be taken at any time.
  3. Students must take at least three other classes in Italian Studies. Of these at least one, but ideally more than one, must be offered in Italian (literature/culture). The three electives may be chosen from an approved list of courses offered in Romance Studies or other departments such as History, Architecture, History of Art, Government, Sociology, and so on. We strongly urge students to consider ITAL 2970 - Introduction to Italian Literature-Utopia and Justice  as one of the electives.

No more than two of these five courses for the minor may be taken abroad or at an institution other than Cornell.

Students may declare the minor at any time.  Students wishing to enroll in the minor must register their intent by contacting the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Italian, who will assign a faculty advisor to students.

Study Abroad in Italy:


Italian studies faculty members strongly encourage students to consider studying abroad in Italy. Students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in Italian and gain a singular perspective on the Italian cultural context.

Students are urged to consider the Bologna Consortial Studies Program (BCSP), of which Cornell is an associated member. BCSP offers qualified undergraduate students an opportunity to study for a full academic year or a semester at the University of Bologna for credit. During each semester of the academic year, which begins in October and extends through June, BCSP students enroll in one or two regular University of Bologna courses with Italian students. Students may also take special courses in Italian literature, language, art history, film studies, and contemporary politics.

Enrollment in a language course is conditional upon the student’s eligibility for the particular level and on attendance at the first scheduled class session. Because of the high demand for language courses, a student who fails to attend the first class meeting will be dropped so others may register.

Note: Students placed in the 2000-level course have the option of taking Italian literature or culture courses as well as language courses.

Spanish:


G. Aching, S. Amigo-Silvestre, M. Beviá, T. Beviá, B. Bosteels,  P. Erber, E. Fernández (visiting), M. A. Garcés, P. Keller, C. Lawless, N. Maldonado-Méndez, J. Oliveira, J. E. Paz-Soldán, S. Pinet, M. K. Redmond, W. Reyes-Cubides, J. Routier-Pucci, B. Teutli. Emeritus: C. Morón Arroyo.

The Major:


The Spanish major is designed to give students proficiency in the oral and written language, to acquaint them with Hispanic and Lusophone cultures, and to develop their skills in literary and linguistic analysis. Satisfactory completion of the major should enable students to meet language and literature requirements for teaching, to continue with graduate work in Spanish, Portuguese or other appropriate disciplines, and to satisfy standards for acceptance into the training programs of the government, social agencies, and business concerns. A Spanish major combined with another discipline may also allow a student to undertake preprofessional training for graduate study in law or medicine. Students interested in the major are encouraged to seek faculty advice as early as possible. For acceptance into the major, students should consult the director of undergraduate studies, who will admit them to the major, and assign them an advisor from the Spanish and Portuguese faculty. Spanish majors will then work out a plan of study in consultation with their advisors. Spanish majors have great flexibility in designing their programs of study and areas of concentration. Previous training and interests as well as vocational goals will be taken into account when the student’s program of course is determined.

SPAN 2190  is a prerequisite to entering the major in Spanish.

All majors will normally include the following core courses in their programs:


Minor in Spanish:


The minor promotes a broad understanding of Hispanic and Lusophone cultures, literature, and societies; it also encourages students to refine and practice their language skills. In order to complete the minor, students must take a minimum of 5 courses (15 credits), distributed as follows: Language competence must be demonstrated by successfully completing either SPAN 3100 - Advanced Spanish Conversation and Pronunciation , or SPAN 3110 - Advanced Spanish Writing Workshop . Students pursuing a minor must furthermore complete either SPAN 2200 - Perspectives on Latin America , SPAN 2240 - [Perspectives on the Caribbean] SPAN 2230 - Perspectives on Spain  or PORT 2800 - Perspectives on Brazil , as well as three elective courses to be chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor. Among those electives, students are strongly encouraged to take at least one course at the advanced 3000- or 4000-level.

Students wishing to enroll in the minor must register their intent by contacting the director of undergraduate studies, who will assign a faculty advisor to each student.

Academic Year Only in Spain: Cornell, the University of Michigan, and the University of Pennsylvania co-sponsor an academic year in Spain program. Students enrolled in this program spend the first month before the fall semester begins in an orientation session at the University of Seville, where they take courses in Spanish language and culture and take advantage of special lectures and field trips. Once the semester begins, students enroll in regular classes at the University of Seville and at the program’s center facility. Center courses are designed for the program and include a seminar offered by the resident director, from the faculty of either Cornell, Michigan, or Pennsylvania. Other center courses typically include history of art, history of the Mediterranean region, a literature course, and Spanish composition and syntax. In Seville, students live in private homes and a rich array of cultural activities and excursions are organized every semester.

Applicants are expected to have completed SPAN 2190  before departure. Completion of SPAN 3110  is highly recommended. Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad for the entire year rather than one semester. Students interested in the study abroad program should visit Cornell Abroad in 474 Uris Hall and see the Cornell Abroad website: visit sce.cornell.edu/ss/programs.php?v=MADRID&s=Overview.

Summer Program in Madrid: A six-week intensive summer program in Madrid, designed to enhance language skills in a cultural context. The 4-credit courses offered satisfy the language requirement of Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences, and SPAN 2230  may count toward the major/minor in Spanish. Courses taught exclusively by Cornell faculty, the courses are complemented by field trips in and outside Madrid. Interested students should contact Cornell’s Summer Program in B20 Day Hall and visit sce.cornell.edu/ss/programs.php?v=MADRID&s=Overview.

Honors: Honors in Spanish may be achieved by superior students who want to undertake guided independent reading and research in an area of their choice. Students in the senior year select a member of the Spanish faculty to supervise their work and direct the writing of their honors essay (see SPAN 4290 SPAN 4300 ).